COMMUNITY GRANTS

The SFI Conservation and Community Partnerships Grant Program fosters partnerships between organizations interested in improving forest management in the United States and Canada, and responsible procurement globally.

Projects address topics of current importance such as improving wildlife habitat management and conservation of biodiversity, avoiding controversial sources of fiber such as those resulting from illegal logging, and assisting local communities through forest education programs and green building projects for low-income families.

Since the program began in 2010, SFI has awarded 63 Conservation and 63 Community Partnership grants totaling more than $4.4 million to foster conservation and community-building projects. When leveraged with project partner contributions, that total investment exceeds $16 million.

The grant program builds on the fact that SFI is the only forest certification standard in North America that requires participants to support and engage in research activities to improve forest health, productivity and sustainable management of forest resources, and the environmental benefits and performance of forest products. Since 1995, SFI program participants have invested more than $1.6 billion in forest research activities.

RESOURCES

Community Grants
Amy Doty

Tel: 202-596-3458
Community Engagement
Jess Kaknevicius

Tel: 715-220-4132
SFI Implementation Committees
Gordy Mouw

Tel: 715-220-4132

GRANTS BY CATEGORY

BLACK FAMILY LAND TRUST

SFI Is Helping Keep Forestlands in the Hands of African American Families

Black Family Land Trust — A Tree, Is A Tree, Is A Tree 101
Why this project matters
Although African Americans had amassed 15 million acres/6 million hectares of land in the U.S. South between 1865 and 1919, today 97% of those lands have been lost, according to the Land Trust Alliance. The Black Family Land Trust is using forestry as a key tool to keep land in the hands of African American families.
Forestry offers many older farmers, landowners not living on their land, and multiple generations of heirs who want to keep their land together, an opportunity to protect their land assets while generating income from their land. Managed forestry can help landowners prosper in retirement and through multiple generations. It can also be a powerful tool to help resolve heirs’ property issues and ownership questions, and offers a means to help preserve the important social and cultural heritage of African American land ownership.
A Tree, Is A Tree, Is A Tree 101, supported in part by funding from SFI Inc., is the Black Family Land Trust’s three-part training on forest management, intended to introduce Southside Virginia landowners to managed forestry as an asset-protection strategy.
  • Session I is an overview of forestry as a conservation and family economic development tool that highlights successful landowners with forest management plans who share their success stories.
  • Session II introduces the concepts and terms of forest management and forest management planning.
  • Session III is a basic overview of the economies of trees and forestry, and how to turn family forests into performing assets for today, tomorrow and for generations to come.
Why is SFI involved?
SFI is committed to identifying ways to support engaging African American forest owners in the U.S. South, including land retention. SFI, as an organization that stands for future forests, believes we can collaborate to help keep forests as forests and ensure that they are responsibly managed to provide conservation values as well as financial benefits to the African Americans who own these forestlands.
The Black Family Land Trust’s program aligns tightly with SFI’s support of underserved communities through forestry. Southside Virginia has one of the highest concentrations of forested and farm land held by African Americans in the state. We know from the Black Family Land Trust’s own work that the Southside region is ground zero for focusing on the potential loss of significant acres of forested land held in fragmented family ownership.
How the project builds SFI community engagement
This grant supports SFI’s community engagement efforts in two primary ways. It supports heritage values and it supports underserved communities through forestry programs. Through partnership and support of others operating effectively on these issues, and by using the natural connections of SFI Implementation Committees and our network of Program Participants, SFI can become a vital piece of the solution to the important issue of African-American land retention and sustainable management.
SFI’s community engagement efforts include the work of SFI Implementation Committees, SFI Community Grants Partners and SFI Inc. initiatives. These efforts have helped elevate and enrich the connections between people and forests. Our support for community-building organizations like the Black Family Land Trust enhances the vital links that exist between healthy forests, responsible purchasing and sustainable communities.
Partners
This partnership includes community leaders, government and the not-for-profit sector:
  • Project lead: Black Family Land Trust
  • Sustainable Forestry Initiative
  • Virginia Department of Forestry
  • U.S. Endowment for Forestry & Communities
Related information
  • The U.S. Endowment for Forestry and Communities received a 2014 SFI Conservation and Community Partnerships Grant to support African American forestland owners.
  • The U.S. Endowment for Forestry and Communities supports related work in multiple landscapes, including Southside Virginia.
  • Black Family Land Trust
About Black Family Land Trust
The Black Family Land Trust, Inc. (BFLT), based in North Carolina, is one of the nation’s only conservation land trust dedicated to the preservation and protection of African-American and other historically underserved landowners assets. The BFLT utilizes the core principles of land conservation and land-based community economic development to achieve our goals. We measurably improve the quality of life for landowners, by providing families with the tools necessary to make informed, proactive decisions regarding their land and its use. The BFLT works primarily in the Southeastern United States, our programs are intergenerational in their design. We honor the legacy of those stewards of the land that came before us and have faith in those stewards of the land that will come after us.

MAINE SFI IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE

SFI Is Helping Maine’s Family Forest Owners Keep Forests as Forests

A Guide to Harvesting Family Woodlands
Why this project matters
Healthy forests are important to the way of life in Maine. A healthy forest provides habitat for wildlife, clean water and air, recreational opportunities, and economic vitality for families and communities. In Maine, 88,000 individuals and families own 25% of its private woodlands, totaling about 4.5 million acres/1.8 million hectares, according to the Maine Forest Service.
The Maine SFI Implementation Committee is leading the development of a Guide to Harvesting Family Woodlands. Encouraging sustainable management of these family woodlands is one of Maine’s most promising strategies for conserving woodlands and their associated benefits throughout the state. Active forest management can provide incentives, financial and otherwise, to help woodland owners keep their land as forest versus converting it for other uses like real estate development. Woodland owners and land managers face significant challenges with management of these parcels and need insight into the complex nature of the ecological, social, operational, and economic aspects of small-scale harvesting.
Why is SFI involved?
This project will produce a guide and up to 10 workshops focused on helping family forest owners keep forests as forests. Supporting A Guide to Harvesting Family Woodlands and the related workshops is part of SFI’s efforts to provide communities with tools to make sustainable choices.
The guide will be a key tool in the project partners’ work to conserve forests, educate forest owners and build partnerships. It will serve as a foundation for educational and training programs aimed at family woodland owners, managers, and operators. The Maine Forest Service and the Maine SFI Implementation Committee, working with local partners, will also offer workshops based on case-studies of a range of successful family woodland operations.
How the project builds SFI community engagement
The Maine SFI Implementation Committee is leading a diverse group of government, conservation and university partners. The primary objective identified in this action plan is outreach and education to individuals and organizations influencing management decisions. A guide to harvesting family woodlands, with associated workshops and case studies, will guide family woodland owners and the professionals they work with through decisions to achieve a successful harvest.
Research from the Maine Forest Service shows these family landowners are very concerned with how their woods will look, and their ability to access their woods and trails when harvesting is complete. This accessible guide will show them what to expect from a harvesting operation, and it will discuss ways to communicate objectives with resource managers before harvesting begins. Helping harvesting professionals interact effectively with family forest owners will encourage wider acceptance of responsible forestry and broaden the understanding of its associated benefits in communities across Maine.
Partners
This partnership includes representatives from government, conservation groups, the University of Maine and SFI Program Participants. These partners include:
  • Project lead: Maine SFI Implementation Committee (consists of SFI Program Participants)
  • Sustainable Forestry Initiative
  • Maine Forest Service
  • Maine Healthy Forests Program
  • Maine Tree Farm Committee
  • Somerset County Soil and Water Conservation District
  • University of Maine, School of Forest Resources
Related information
  • Pine Tree Camp is a summer camp for Maine children and adults with disabilities that gives them a chance to enjoy Maine’s outdoors (video). The Maine SFI Implementation Committee led a project to donate materials to upgrade the camp.
  • An SFI Conservation and Community Partnerships Grant is supporting research by Keeping Maine’s Forests into how carbon credit programs might better account for carbon sequestration in sustainably managed forests.
  • More than a million acres/400,000 hectares of state lands, managed by the Bureau of Parks and Lands of the Maine Department of Agriculture, are certified to the SFI Forest Management Standard.
  • The Maine SFI Implementation Committee founded the Fisheries Improvement Network (FIN). It’s a forum where forest landowners and managers can interact with agency fishery managers and organizations interested in improving Maine’s fisheries.
  • Maine SFI Implementation Committee
About Maine SFI Implementation Committee
The Maine SFI Implementation Committee (SIC) is comprised of representatives from various stakeholder groups, including the Maine Forest Service, an array of associations with interests in forest management and forest sustainability, and SFI Program Participants.
The Maine SIC works at the local level to promote the SFI Standard as a means to broaden the practice of sustainable forestry and ensure on-the-ground progress. These resource professionals volunteer a significant amount of time to assure that national SFI program objectives are consistently implemented and adapted to region-specific needs.

MISSISSIPPI FOREST FOUNDATION

Mississippi State University Architecture Students Gain Valuable Mass Timber Knowledge

Mass Timber Technology Studio
Why this project matters
The Mass Timber Technology Studio is a fourth-year architecture class at Mississippi State University. This studio will include programming and instruction from forest industry leaders as well as the requirement to design a state-of-the-art wood structure. The design will demonstrate innovative heavy timber construction and use wood certified to SFI.
After participating in this class, students will not only know how to design with wood; they will have an understanding of the benefits of proper forest management and the importance of certification. Students will have the opportunity to learn about local forest products and talk to SFI Program Participants about best management practices and sustainably sourced products.
Why is SFI involved?
The Mass Timber Technology Studio is directly aligned with the SFI’s focus on training and educating current and future practitioners who are engaged in actions affecting the future of our forests. Each student that participates in the Mass Timber Technology Studio will be taught about the SFI Standards. The Mississippi Forestry Foundation will feature SFI prominently throughout the lifetime of their Mass Timber Technology Studio project. Through the project, senior level architecture students at Mississippi State University will work collaboratively with the project partners to plan and design a building with Southern Yellow Pine certified to SFI, using wood‑building technology and mass‑timber construction. Sustainable forestry will play a major role in this class.
Another important aspect of this studio will be teaching the architecture students about the economic impact that forestry has on the U.S. South. Through this class, students will explore ways to incorporate wood in design and also promote the use of local forest products among their future peers. The curriculum will incorporate Continuing Education Unit resources, including “Creating a New Path for Forest Products in Green Buildings” from SFI. The building designs created through this studio will use advanced wood technologies with the goal of increasing demand and market value for Southern Yellow Pine. After graduation, an increased number of architects will join the work force with an understanding of the long‑term benefits of well-managed forests and the ability to design mass‑timber buildings.
How the project builds SFI community engagement
This project has the potential to equip many architectural students soon to enter the workforce with knowledge about how to use wood and the importance of forest certification. Architects have been a target audience of SFI’s for some time. The project also brings together the Mississippi State University’s School of Architecture and College of Forest Resources with the Department of Sustainable Bioproducts, providing for collaborative learning experience. Potential enhancements for the project include developing a how to guide, allowing this project to be leveraged by other SFI Implementation Committees, making the project scalable and replicable.
Partners
This partnership includes academics and an SFI Program Participant.
  • Project lead: Mississippi State University – School of Architecture
  • Sustainable Forestry Initiative
  • Mississippi State University – College of Forest Resources and the Department of Sustainable Bioproducts
  • Shuqualak Lumber (SFI Program Participant)
Related information
About Mississippi Forestry Foundation
The Mississippi Forestry Foundation was established in 1964 by the Mississippi Forestry Association to promote and carry out educational, literary, scientific, and charitable programs to better conserve, develop, and protect the forest and related natural resources of Mississippi for the best interest of this and future generations.

WHITEFISH SCHOOL DISTRICT

SFI Is Helping Montana Students to Engage in Forest-Based Research and Sustainable Forestry Practices

Whitefish Lake Institute Center for Sustainability and Entrepreneurship
Why This Project Matters
The Whitefish Lake Institute Center for Sustainability and Entrepreneurship is a planned innovative educational center in Whitefish, Montana. It will provide hands-on learning experiences for K-12 students in sustainable energy, agriculture, forestry, natural resources and entrepreneurship. The fundamental objective of the center is to prepare Whitefish students for college, careers and citizenship by immersing them in interdependent, real-world programs.
The center was an idea started by students and teachers and led by the Whitefish School District. Through a private funding partnership and grants it will become a showcase for the community’s support for schools and for new ways to develop better citizens and leaders. The center — to be located on more than three acres/1.2 hectares of land — will include a greenhouse, a two-story classroom building, gardens, an orchard, an experimental forest, a native grass meadow, a wet meadow detention pond and trails.
Students enrolled in the Flathead Valley Community College Natural Resource and Conservation Program will collaborate with Whitefish High School students on GIS mapping field studies, and examining forestry topics like productivity rates and forest hydrology. Results from field studies will lead to action plans that promote sustainable forest management. Whitefish High School students will in turn mentor Whitefish Middle School and Muldown Elementary students on studies and service projects connected to their work with Flathead Valley Community College. This project will connect youth to their own sustainable forest on lands owned by the center.
Why is SFI Involved?
SFI values this project because it builds mentorship experiences in which students learn from students about sustainable forest management. It also has the potential to encourage students to pursue careers in forestry.
One of SFI’s priorities is to connect youth to forests through education. We look for ways to instill a lifelong appreciation for the value forests represent for biodiversity, the wider environment, sustainable communities, responsibly sourced forest products and for our shared quality of life. The educational focus of this project also supports SFI’s focus on encouraging the next generation of future forest leaders.
Our work with Boy Scouts of America, Girl Guides of Canada, Scouts Canada, and other youth organizations and school programs like Project Learning Tree and Earth Rangers, helps build healthy kids. It also engages youth in conservation activities and outdoor education.
Our kids’ contact with nature keeps shrinking. Today’s emphasis on screen time and indoor play is also linked to psychological and physical effects like obesity, loneliness, depression and attention problems. Getting kids into forests and helping them learn about sustainability is good for forests and good for kids.
How the Project Builds SFI Community Engagement
F.H. Stoltze Land and Lumber Company, the oldest family-owned lumber company in Montana, is an SFI Program Participant and project partner. The Center for Sustainability and Entrepreneurship will be built using lumber from F.H. Stoltze. F.H. Stoltze, the U.S. Forest Service, National Park Service, and non-profit Whitefish Lake Institute are partnering with the Whitefish School District to help students learn about their surrounding forest and watershed zones.
The center’s experimental forest will also be a model for promoting SFI’s forest certification program and the associated conservation values it promotes like clean water, clean air and biodiversity. Whitefish School District will work with SFI Inc. and F.H. Stoltze to ensure the K-12 forestry related curriculum content aligns with SFI best practices.
Partners
This partnership includes representatives from a school board, a non-profit group, a college and an SFI Program Participant. Project partners:
  • Project lead: Whitefish School District
  • Sustainable Forestry Initiative
  • F.H. Stoltze Land and Lumber Company (SFI Program Participant)
  • Weyerhaeuser (SFI Program Participant)
  • Whitefish Lake Institute
  • Flathead Valley Community College
Related information
The Montana Forest Restoration Committee won the SFI 2014 Conservation Leadership Award for helping grizzly bear habitat and restoring forests.
Whitefish School District
About Whitefish School District
At Whitefish Schools our vision is to engage students in their own learning through goal-oriented experiences guided by innovative, inspiring educators and community partners. Talented teachers, support staff and administrators in Whitefish Schools work to make this happen each and every day and the Whitefish community joins in to make learning meaningful, relevant and connected to the world beyond school.
The Center for Sustainability and Entrepreneurship is expected to open in 2017, with a focus on agriculture, natural resources, forestry, energy and entrepreneurship. Students in grades K-12 will participate in hands-on projects in this net zero experiential learning center.

LAKES ENVIRONMENTAL ASSOCIATION

Maine Students Get Up Close and Personal with Forests and Critters

Maine Students Get Up Close and Personal with Forests and Critters
Why this project matters
Maine is more heavily forested than any other state. Despite this, the public, business owners, policymakers, and students have a minimal understanding of forest ecosystems and best management practices relating to water quality and other important environmental measures.
The Sustainable Forests Project will expand Lakes Environmental Association offerings, especially to students, and will greatly enhance field trip and outdoor learning opportunities. Students from Stevens Brook Elementary School in Bridgton can walk to the Interpretive Forest Trail at the Science Center, and for others, it is a short bus ride. This project will also support underserved urban communities in the Bridgton area. Students will be able to learn about tree identification, forest ecosystems, and forest practices while monitoring study plots.
Why is SFI involved?
Forestry is the primary land use in lake watersheds. Sustainable forestry, as practiced by SFI Program Participants, will help conserve Maine’s lakes. The Lakes Environmental Association promotes understanding of sustainable forestry and educates future practitioners, landowners, students, decision makers, and professionals through educational resources at three preserves, school curricula, and workshops.
One of SFI’s priorities is to connect youth to forests through education. We look for ways to instill a lifelong appreciation for the value forests represent for biodiversity, the wider environment, sustainable communities, responsibly sourced forest products and for our shared quality of life. The educational focus of this project also supports SFI’s focus on encouraging the next generation of future forest leaders.
How the project builds SFI community engagement
This project has strong involvement of key SFI partners and builds on existing relationships and work.  Through the project, the Lakes Environmental Association will create centers with infrastructure to support educational programs for students and schools, land managers and landowners. The Maine chapter of Project Learning Tree, an award-winning environmental education program of SFI, will be closely involved in developing the project’s educational programming.
Working with the Maine Forest Products Council, the Maine Forest Service, the Maine SFI Implementation Committee, and SFI Program Participant Hancock Lumber Company, a series of workshops will be developed to address such issues as harvesting aesthetics, stream crossings, water quality issues, managing forestry for wildlife, best management practices, and sustainable forestry issues and techniques.
Partners
This partnership includes educators, environmentalists, volunteers, government officials and SFI Program Participants.
  • Project lead: Lakes Environmental Association
  • Sustainable Forestry Initiative
  • Project Learning Tree — Maine
  • Maine Forest Service
  • Maine Forest Products Council
  • Maine SFI Implementation Committee
  • Portland Water District
Related information
  • Project Learning Tree, an SFI program, is an award-winning environmental education program designed for teachers and other educators, parents, and community leaders working with youth from preschool through grade 12.
  • Following an educator forestry tour, part of  PLT’s Summer Forestry Institutes for Teachers, high school teacher Susan Linscott in Maine has found ways to engage her students in studying real‑world issues in their community.
  • SFI is helping Maine’s family forest owners keep forests as forests — A Guide to Harvesting Family Woodlands.
About the Lakes Environmental Association
The Lakes Environmental Association (LEA) is dedicated to protecting the waters and watersheds of Western Maine. Since 1970, LEA has been the voice of lake protection in the Lakes Region. Maine might not have a milfoil program today if LEA hadn’t fought so hard in the state legislature. When the federal government proposed a nuclear waste dump near Sebago Lake, LEA played a big part in the battle to defeat it. And right now, LEA is trying hard to increase enforcement of Maine’s environmental protection laws, while at the same time helping property owners understand how and why lake protection is vital.

NATURE CONSERVANCY CANADA

Conserving Forested Waterways in Atlantic Canada

The Active River Area
Why this project matters
Well‑managed forests conserve sources of clean water. Over half the drinking water in the U.S. and nearly two‑thirds in Canada comes from forests. The Active River Area framework is a tool to measure the contribution of forests to freshwater ecosystem function and health. The first of its kind in Atlantic Canada, the framework classifies all habitats associated with freshwater ecosystems while recognizing the range of hydrological conditions typical of natural aquatic systems. To be completed for New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island, it will bring an integrated hydrogeological-ecological approach to freshwater modelling, management, and climate change mitigation.
Why is SFI involved?
The Active River Area project will provide a framework to measure the impacts that forestlands certified to SFI have on water quality, climate change resilience and biodiversity. By delineating and mapping the various components of a complete freshwater ecosystem, forest harvesting plans can be assessed against their potential impact. The Active River Area framework can inform management plans by directing lower-impact harvesting toward areas within the Active River Area to minimize the ecological and hydrological impacts in sensitive areas. Floodplain mapping will allow SFI Program Participants to demonstrate the contribution of managed forests to floodwater retention and control. The framework can inform where ecological restoration will improve floodplain connectivity to better mitigate the impacts of flooding on downstream communities, particularly in relation to climate change.
How the project builds SFI community engagement
This project is a collaborative effort that involves a core team representing SFI Program Participants, government, ENGOs, and academia. The project will also involve technical input through a contract with the original Active River Area developers at The Nature Conservancy. The project scope includes all of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island, and the scalability of the project will allow partners to demonstrate the value of SFI certification at local, provincial and regional scales.
Nature Conservancy Canada will reach out to provincial and municipal governments and host webinars and in-person information sessions to promote the use of the Active River Area framework, citing support from SFI. Nature Conservancy Canada will seek out opportunities to present the results of the analysis at science workshops and events held throughout the Maritimes. There is also a proposal to present the project at a conference hosted by the Union of Nova Scotia Municipalities held each fall in Halifax. Upon completion of the project, Nature Conservancy Canada is prepared to present at the SFI Annual Conference to promote the scalability of the analysis with potential use in other jurisdictions across Canada and the United States.
Partners
This partnership includes conservationists, government officials, academics and forestry professionals.
  • Project lead: Nature Conservancy of Canada (Atlantic Region)
  • Sustainable Forestry Initiative
  • Maritime SFI Implementation Committee
  • New Brunswick Department of Energy and Resource Development
  • World Wildlife Fund Canada
  • Wildlife Conservation Society Canada
  • Dalhousie University
  • Nature New Brunswick
  • Government of Nova Scotia
Related information
  • Water quality is one of three focal areas for the SFI Conservation Impact Project.
  • SFI presented at Nature Conservancy of Canada’s “Why Forests Matter” speaker series held in Calgary, Montreal and Toronto and discussed the many benefits forests bring, the importance of responsible forest management and how SFI stands for future forests.
  • Nature Conservancy of Canada, Earth Rangers and SFI Want to Make Life Less Scary for Amphibians at Halloween and All Year Round (media release).
  • U.S. Endowment for Forests and Communities: Engaging the Water Community in Determining Financial Value and Instruments for Watershed Service Projects (media release).
About Nature Conservancy Canada
The Nature Conservancy of Canada is Canada’s leading land conservation organization, working to protect valuable natural areas and the plants and animals they sustain. Since 1962, the Nature Conservancy of Canada and its partners have helped to protect more than 2 million acres/800,000 hectares coast to coast. Through strong partnerships, the Nature Conservancy of Canada works to safeguard natural areas so that our children and grandchildren will have the chance to enjoy them.

ASSOCIATION FORESTIÉRE SAGUENAY-LAC-ST-JEAN

Helping Youth Rediscover Quebec’s Forestry Culture

Forests and Forest Products, a Culture to be Rediscovered
Why this project matters
The Forests and Forest Products, A Culture to be Rediscovered Program, from the Association forestière Saguenay-Lac-St-Jean, has a track record of delivering tangible and measurable results when it comes to connecting youth to forests through education. Making these connections is good for youth because it can inspire a lifelong interest in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) and open up rewarding career paths. Forests benefit too as youth enhance their understanding of the central role forests play when it comes to environmental, recreational and economic values.
The association tours elementary schools from September until June offering a half-day program that takes place in classrooms and in woodlots near schools for fourth-, fifth- and sixth‑grade students. The program reaches about 12,000 students every year. School-based forest education aims to educate youth about the social, economic, ecological and cultural importance of the forest environment and sustainable forest management. The association also wants to promote forestry and wood as an element of sustainable development and to interest young people in careers in forestry.
Why is SFI involved?
Connecting youth to forests is a key focus at SFI. Fostering an appreciation and understanding of the natural world is critical to healthy mental and physical development in youth. But today’s American and Canadian kids spend more time indoors than previous generations. That’s why a key component of SFI’s community engagement is educating youth and getting them outdoors, to ensure they can be effective future leaders and have a strong understanding of the value of responsibly managed forests.
Forests and Forest Products, A Culture to be Rediscovered gets kids outdoors and potentially opens up STEM-based career options. Workshops organized with college- and university‑level STEM and architecture technology students are designed to generate interest in forestry and forest products and related technical careers and professions.
The Quebec SFI Implementation Committee (SIC) will work to help ensure connections to forest products certified to SFI and Project Learning Tree materials. Project Learning Tree, an SFI program, is an award-winning environmental education program designed for teachers and other educators, parents, and community leaders working with youth from preschool through grade 12. Forests and Forest Products, A Culture to be Rediscovered offers an opportunity to expand PLT Canada, an initiative of SFI, in Quebec.
How the Project Builds SFI Community Engagement
This is a great program to engage a variety of youth, from primary grades to technical schools that also include architectural students. The primary partner is the Quebec’s Ministry of Forests, Wildlife and Parks but multiple schools, regional municipalities and Employment Quebec are also included. The support of the Quebec SIC will also build connections between SFI Program Participants, youth, educators, and government officials at the municipal and provincial levels.
Partners
This partnership includes SFI Program Participants, youth, educators, and government officials.
  • Project lead: Association forestière Saguenay-Lac-St-Jean
  • Sustainable Forestry Initiative
  • Quebec SFI Implementation Committee
  • Quebec Ministry of Forests, Wildlife and Parks
  • Employment Quebec
  • Five regional municipalities
  • Four CEGEPs
  • Four school districts (Rives du Saguenay, Lac St. Jean, Pays de Bluets, de la Jonquiere)
  • Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) PromoScience Program
Related information
  • Project Learning Tree, an SFI program, is an award-winning environmental education program designed for teachers and other educators, parents, and community leaders working with youth from preschool through grade 12.
  • The Marten Monitoring and Youth Knowledge Transfer Program, led by the Cree First Nation of Waswanipi in Quebec, is evaluating the impact of wildlife management guidelines on marten populations and transferring knowledge to Cree youth.
  • Funding from SFI helps the Earth Rangers School Assembly Program offer a curriculum-linked assembly presentation, for grades 1 to 6, that uses science-based information to educate students about the importance of conserving biodiversity across Canada.
About the Association forestière Saguenay-Lac-St-Jean
Founded in 1942, the Association forestière Saguenay-Lac-St-Jean (French only) is a non-profit organization dedicated to educating, informing and educating the regional population about the importance of forests, the environment and sustainable development. The association uses interactive educational workshops in schools and forests, and its annual conference, for training and knowledge transfer. The Forest Products, A Culture to be Rediscovered Program works to help the residents of the Lac Saint-Jean area understand the challenges facing forests as well as their economic, social, environmental and cultural importance from a sustainable development perspective.

INVASIVE SPECIES COUNCIL OF BRITISH COLUMBIA

Online Forest Management Training Tool Helps Prevent the Spread of Invasive Species in British Columbia

Why this project matters
Invasive species are plants, animals or other organisms not native to an area whose introduction and spread harms native species and the economy. Most invasive species are unintentionally introduced by humans into places outside their native habitat. A lack of natural predators and diseases mean invasives can often reproduce, spread and survive better than native species. With few limits on their populations they can easily take over sensitive ecosystems — permanently upsetting the balance of plant, insect, bird and animal life.
This project, led by the Invasive Species Council of British Columbia, takes a creative approach to online invasives training that will engage forest professionals in preventing the spread of invasives in BC and beyond. The outcome will be healthier forests resulting from educated forest practitioners, who have the knowledge and tools to prevent the spread of invasives.
Why is SFI involved?
Invasive species are one of the greatest threats to biodiversity on the planet. While this project falls into the community grant category, there are many overlaps with the conservation stream because of the effect of invasive species on biodiversity. The online workshops delivered through this project will build awareness of invasive exotic plants and animals, prevent new introductions, and potentially avoid new occurrences in almost 4 million hectares of forest in BC alone. The resources developed and produced through this project will describe and encourage forest practices that reduce the abundance of invasive exotic plants and animals.
This online invasive species training program has the potential to significantly impact forests in Canada, and across North America, by preventing the spread of invasive species, protecting forest biodiversity and helping SFI partners to meet the performance measures in the SFI Standards. This project will contribute to the standardization of invasive species training across jurisdictional boundaries. The program will broaden the expertise of SFI Program Participants on invasive species prevention and management. SFI Program Participants and the Western Canada SFI Implementation Committee will pilot test the online training, providing feedback to improve the quality and relevance of the online training program.
How the project builds SFI community engagement
This project will train and educate current and future practitioners who are engaged in action affecting the future of our forests through an exciting and relevant online training platform. Once implemented, project leaders hope to connect with SFI Implementation Committees across Canada and the United States for broader deployment. This project aims to engage forest practitioners in the prevention and management of invasive species through collaboration with current training programs.
Additionally, SFI will leverage this project through all active social media channels. SFI will also consider holding a workshop at the SFI Annual Conference for pilot testing the program with a broader audience from across the SFI Implementation Committees network to encourage maximum uptake by forestry professionals.
Partners
This partnership includes community volunteers, conservationists, researchers and SFI Program Participants.
  • Project lead: Invasive Species Council of British Columbia
  • Sustainable Forestry Initiative
  • Western Canada SFI Implementation Committee
  • Interfor Corporation (SFI Program Participant)
  • BC Timber Sales (SFI Program Participant)
  • TimberWest Corporation (SFI Program Participant)
Related information
About the Invasive Species Council of British Columbia
The Invasive Species Council of British Columbia is a registered charity and non-profit society that is making a difference in the lives of all British Columbians. The council is a dynamic action-oriented organization, helping to coordinate and unite a wide variety of concerned stakeholders in the struggle against invasive species in BC and spearheading behavioral change in gardeners, outdoor recreation enthusiasts, Indigenous people and resource industry and horticultural professionals.

ALABAMA FORESTRY FOUNDATION

Wonder of Woodlands

Project Overview

The Alabama Forestry Foundation will develop learning materials and indoor/outdoor training sessions to educate stakeholders about some of the unique communities within Alabama’s landscape.
A $10,000 grant from SFI Inc. will help this project broaden the knowledge and expertise of foresters and loggers, and help tell the story of why it is critical to conserve Alabama’s diverse communities of animal and plant species. It will also help link how responsible forest management contributes to conserving this special ecosystem. Information on how to recognize, appreciate, and conserve these areas during active forest management will also be included.
Project Partners
In addition to the Alabama Forestry Foundation, partners include the Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, Alabama Forestry Commission, Alabama SFI Implementation Committee, Alabama Tree Farm, Auburn University’s School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service.
About the Alabama Forestry Foundation
The Alabama Forestry Foundation was founded in 1978 to advance knowledge of managing and using Alabama’s forests; promoting the stewardship and sustainable management of Alabama’s forest resources; and protecting the property rights of Alabama’s forest owners.

AMERICAN FOREST FOUNDATION

From Nature’s Perspective

Project Overview
Fostering an appreciation and understanding of the natural world is critical to healthy development in kids; yet in North America studies consistently find that kids are spending more time indoors and losing this essential environmental connection. To address this issue the American Forest Foundation’s Project Learning Tree (PLT) program received $5,000 to partner with Michigan Project Learning Tree and the Grand Traverse Conservation District to sponsor a conference for PLT Coordinators and educators in order to provide meaningful arts and environmental education to Michigan students while creating a model that can be implemented nationwide by other PLT state program networks.
The grant offers an ideal opportunity for AFF, PLT, the Conservation District and local schools to partner in providing a lasting impact. The Conference attendees gained professional development experience allowing them to widely implement Project Learning Tree. Additionally, students from local schools were given the opportunity to share their Project Learning Tree journals and artwork with the larger conference audience.
Supporting the SFI Standard
The project supported SFI 2010-2014 Standard Objective 17: Community Involvement in the Practice of Sustainable Forestry, including Performance Measure 17.2 requiring program participants support and promote public outreach, education and involvement related to sustainable forest management.
PROJECT RESOURCES
Project Overview PDF
About Project Learning Tree
Project Learning Tree (PLT) is an award-winning environmental education program designed for teachers and other educators, parents, and community leaders working with youth from preschool through grade 12. PLT is a program of the American Forest Foundation.

AUBURN UNIVERSITY

Lion’s Park Boy Scout Hut Build

Project Description
Through the SFI Community Partnerships grant program, Auburn University’s Rural Studio completed a student design-build project. The Lion’s Park Boy Scout Hut provides the Boy Scouts of Greensboro, AL a much needed headquarters. View some photos here.
Supporting the SFI Standard
The project will support SFI 2010-2014 Standard Objective 7: Efficient Use of Forest Resources and Objective 17: Community Involvement in the Practice of Sustainable Forestry, including Performance Measure 17.2 requiring that program participants support and promote public outreach, education and involvement related to sustainable forestry management.
Project Partners
In addition to the Auburn University’s Rural Studio, partners include Boy Scouts of Greensboro, Al; Probate Judge of Hale County and the Greensboro, AL Lions Club.
About Auburn University’s Rural Studio
Rural Studio is an off-campus design-build program of the School of Architecture, Planning and Landscape Architecture at Auburn University. It gives architecture students a more hands-on educational experience. The students work within the community to define solutions, fundraise, design and, ultimately, build remarkable projects.

CENTRE FOR FOREST INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH, UNIVERSITY OF WINNIPEG

SFI Is Helping Foster Innovation in Forestry

The Forest-Community Innovation Network
Why this project matters
Canada’s forest industry and the communities that depend on it must address economic transition, social pressures and environmental change to remain viable. In response, different forest groups are engaging in public debate, grassroots organizing, technological and product innovation, and policy reform processes. These efforts are focused on rethinking relationships among communities, governments, Indigenous peoples, industries and Canada’s forests. Although implementing creative and new collaborative approaches is proving to be a complex task, new arrangements involving Indigenous and community groups, companies and governments already offer a growing body of experience to draw upon.
Led by the Centre for Forest Interdisciplinary Research at the University of Winnipeg, the Forest-Community Innovation Network is an active collaborative knowledge forum to support ongoing networking and practical research work critical to engaging diverse forest groups in processes of innovation. The Innovation Network is dedicated to implementing a vision for an integrated knowledge network dedicated to community resilience, cross-cultural collaboration, adaptation to environmental change, and innovation.
Why is SFI involved?
One of SFI’s priorities is to bring diverse partners together to advance responsible forestry through training and education. SFI and the Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business have had a long-standing partnership focused on enhancing collaborative business relationships and progressive aboriginal relations.
The Forest-Community Innovation Network will help SFI further engage with existing partners, such as the Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business, and build new partnerships, and will assist SFI in leveraging its cross-Canada scale at the community level. In addition, the Forest-Community Innovation Network recognizes that conventional forestry training is evolving and the network of partners needed to address complex forest issues is expanding and becoming more diverse.
More importantly perhaps, is the co-learning now taking place as a result of the collaborative engagements involving Indigenous groups, communities, companies and government, for example. Ultimately, the Forest-Community Innovation Network will create further opportunities to collaboratively investigate and develop training and education modules specifically targeted to sustainable forest management issues. Training resource professionals is a key focus for SFI. In 2015, more than 10,000 resource and harvesting professionals participated in training run by SFI Implementation Committees.
How the project builds SFI community engagement
The Forest-Community Innovation Network will give SFI Program Participants an avenue to support and promote Indigenous values through close partnerships with Indigenous organizations and representatives. The partnership will benefit from the guidance of Indigenous and non-Indigenous partners who are committed to working together and who have experience in cross-cultural collaborative forestry settings. This initiative will also enable Indigenous partners and other communities to enhance community and forest sustainability.
The Forest-Community Innovation Network is also designed to serve underserved communities by linking forest users of many stripes to knowledge and resources for improving sustainable management of forests. Target users are typically Indigenous and non-Indigenous community groups that do not have ready access to forest management extension services and expertise. The network will include opportunities to promote awareness of the SFI Program and forest management certification.
Partners
This partnership includes representatives from Indigenous groups and academia. These partners include:
  • Project lead: Centre for Forest Interdisciplinary Research, University of Winnipeg
  • Sustainable Forestry Initiative
  • Canadian Council for Aboriginal Business
Related information
About Centre for Forest Interdisciplinary Research, University of Winnipeg
The Centre for Forest Interdisciplinary Research (C-FIR) at The University of Winnipeg is dedicated to interdisciplinary research, education, and training in forest science, policy and management. Established in 1998, C-FIR focuses on understanding the ecological, economic, and socio-cultural conditions that shape forests and the natural resources provided by forest systems in Manitoba and around the world. C-FIR researchers carry out leading edge natural and social science research to advance understanding of past, present and future changes and impacts, as well as the links between forest ecosystems and society, in order to promote more sustainable use of forest environments.

CENTER FOR NATIVE PEOPLES ANS THE ENVIRONMENT

Exploring Forest Sustainability with Indigenous Youth

Project Overview
Centre for Native Peoples and the Environment: State University of New York – College of Environmental Science and Forestry will develop and implement an educational program that focuses on the sustainability of ecologically and culturally significant tree species that we will incorporate into the Native Earth Environmental Youth Camp (NEEYC). NEEYC is a camp devoted to sustainable science and traditional ecological knowledge that they run in partnership with the Haudenosaunee Environmental Task Force.
Project Partners
Haudenosaunee Environmental Task Force
About Center for Native Peoples and the Environment
Our region is the home of two great intellectual traditions regarding stewardship of the earth: traditional ecological knowledge of indigenous people and scientific ecological knowledge. The mission of the SUNY-ESF Center for Native Peoples and the Environment is to create programs that draw on the wisdom of both indigenous and scientific knowledge in support of our shared goals of environmental sustainability.

CLEMSON UNIVERSITY HABITAT FOR HUMANITY

Homecoming Build 2016

Project Overview
Every year, more than 500 Clemson University students come together to build a Habitat house for a local family on the campus’ Bowman Field, during the 10 days leading up to the homecoming football game. Clemson University’s Habitat chapter will receive a $10,000 grant to build the 24th Annual Homecoming House.
After the 10-day build, the walls and roof are up, the drywall and siding have been hung, and the windows, doors, and basic electricity and plumbing have been installed. The house is opened for public viewing on Saturday, and then moved to a local neighborhood. Wood products certified to the SFI Standard will be used in the build.
Project Partners
In addition to the Clemson University Campus Chapter of Habitat for Humanity, partners include the South Carolina SFI Implementation Committee and the Lutheran Campus Ministry at Clemson.
About Clemson University Campus Chapter of Habitat for Humanity
The Clemson University Campus Chapter of Habitat for Humanity was established in 1994 following its participation in the building of a home on Bowman Field during the 1993 homecoming celebration. Since then, the chapter has organized several outstanding projects, including the 2001 “Blitz Build” during which five houses were completed. In 2003, Clemson Habitat spurred the building of the first ever Youth United home in partnership with D.W. Daniel High School in Central, South Carolina.

CORNELL UNIVERSITY

Building STEM Engagement Focused on Homes for Nesting Birds

Project Overview
Cornell University will engage local youth in the construction of nest box trails for the benefit of native birds and the environment. Wood products certified to the SFI Standard will be used to build the nest boxes. The university will also develop a free online curriculum, to expand the project’s reach, and deliver 18 workshops with their partners to test curriculum and engage students.
Through this series of workshops focused on youth, family and community, the curriculum will include lessons in science (biology, ecology, habitat) and technology (mapping, data exploration) surrounding the NestWatch citizen-science project for afterschool and 4-H audiences. Cornell University will receive $8,733 in 2016, 2017 and 2018 to complete this project.
Project Partners
In addition to the Cornell University, partners include the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Cornell Co-Op Extension Jefferson County and Columbia/Greene Counties, and New York State 4-H.
About the Cornell Lab of Ornithology
The Cornell Lab of Ornithology is a world leader in the study, appreciation, and conservation of birds. Its hallmarks are scientific excellence and technological innovation to advance the understanding of nature and to engage people of all ages in learning about birds and protecting the planet.

CREE FIRST NATION OF WASWANIPI

SFI Is Supporting the Transfer of Scientific and Traditional Knowledge to Cree Youth in Waswanipi

Marten Monitoring and Youth Knowledge Transfer
Why this project matters
Indigenous youth are Canada’s fastest-growing demographic group. At the same time, many of these Indigenous youth feel unsure of the opportunities they will be able to enjoy as adults. The Marten Monitoring and Youth Knowledge Transfer project will help youth see how the Cree way of life still connects very strongly to the land. It will pass on the values that teach the Cree to take only what they need from the land and ensure the continued existence of forests, rivers and wildlife. The program will also introduce Cree youth to scientific concepts and encourage them to consider careers as wildlife and resource professionals.
The monitoring program, based in the Cree community of Waswanipi, 700 kilometres/435 miles north of Montreal, will evaluate the impact of wildlife management guidelines on marten populations. The monitoring program combines western science and traditional knowledge aimed to transfer knowledge to Cree youth in the community. The monitoring program will also support the implementation of Cree standards and wildlife management for Cree wildlife sites of interest on Waswanipi lands.
The project will bring Cree youth to the trap line to monitor wildlife in an educational way, using scientific and traditional knowledge. They will participate in all the steps of the monitoring, from the elaboration of measuring instruments to the analysis of data, and will learn from the proven tracking methods of their forefathers. Learning will take place with peers in a natural setting as much as possible. The monitoring program will also include formal training with wildlife-monitoring techniques, which could potentially lead to career opportunities in resource and wildlife management.
Why is SFI involved?
SFI values this project because it will help transfer knowledge to youth and combine traditional and scientific approaches. The project’s potential to lead to career opportunities in resource and wildlife management is another key reason for SFI’s support.
One of SFI’s priorities is to connect youth to forests through education. We look for ways to instill a lifelong appreciation for the value forests represent for biodiversity, the broader environment, sustainable communities, responsibly sourced forest products and for our shared quality of life. The educational focus of this project also supports SFI’s focus on encouraging the next generation of future forest leaders.
Our work with Girl Guides of Canada, Scouts Canada, Boy Scouts of America, and other youth organizations and school programs like Earth Rangers and Project Learning Tree helps build healthy kids. It also engages youth in conservation activities and outdoor education.
Our kids’ contact with nature keeps shrinking. Today’s emphasis on screen time and indoor play is also linked to psychological and physical effects like obesity, loneliness, depression and attention problems. Getting kids into forests and helping them learn about sustainability is good for forests and good for kids.
How the project builds SFI community engagement
This project stands out from standard scientific monitoring programs because it advocates the integration of traditional knowledge from trappers and elders of the community in the development of protocols and the establishment of the monitoring.
The project also gives Resolute Canada and other SFI Program Participants in the Quebec SFI Implementation Committee an opportunity to engage directly with the community of Waswanipi. It will ultimately lead to a new rigorous resource management tool developed by and for the community, which could include prescribed guidelines for companies who work in the territory and who are likely to have an impact on the natural environment or on the practice of Cree traditional activities.
Partners
This partnership includes representatives from non-profit groups and SFI Program Participants. These partners include:
  • Project lead: Cree First Nation of Waswanipi
  • Sustainable Forestry Initiative
  • The Gull Family
  • Willie J. Happyjack Memorial School
  • Waska Resources
  • Cree Trappers Association
  • Resolute Canada (SFI Program Participant)
  • Quebec SFI Implementation Committee (consisting of SFI Program Participants)
Related information
About Cree First Nation of Waswanipi
The modern community of Waswanipi is located on Highway 113 along Waswanipi River and is accessible by road. Waswanipi means “Light on the Water”, it describes our past when we used the torch light fuelled by pine tar, to spear and catch sturgeon that had gathered to spawn at the mouth of Waswanipi River.
While the development of the region has had an impact on our lands and community, we are committed to the sustainable management of our resources. Our hard work and dedication with the model forest networks is an example to what can be achieved through proper consultation and research on development with our respective traditional territory. We have locally owned businesses to provide you with meals, groceries, supplies and equipment. We have hiking and cross-country ski trails, rustic camping spots, and a number of beautiful lakes and several challenging rivers for canoeing and kayaking.

EARTH RANGERS

School Assembly Program Development

Project Overview
The Earth Rangers School Assembly Program offers a dynamic, fun and interactive presentation for grades 1-6. The program consists of a high quality, curriculum-linked assembly presentation that uses positive, science-based information to educate students about the importance of protecting biodiversity while highlighting conservation initiatives across Canada. Earth Rangers will receive $10,000 in 2016 and 2017 to help fund this program.
The funding will help complete development of a section of Earth Rangers’ 2016-17 School Assembly Program dedicated to educating students about forest ecosystems and sustainable forestry in Canada. Through the power of live animal demonstrations and exciting audience interaction, the School Assembly Program inspires students and motivates them to become actively involved in protecting the environment.
About Earth Rangers
Earth Rangers is the kids’ conservation organization, dedicated to educating children about biodiversity and conservation and empowering them to protect animals and their habitats.

EARTH RANGERS

Canadian Kids Get a Close Up Look at Forest Birds and Learn Why Forests Are a Way of Life

Earth Rangers School Assembly Program Delivery
Why this project matters
Earth Rangers’ School Assembly Program is an extremely successful program, reaching nearly 250,000 students in grades 1-6, in a single school year. The program delivers a dynamic, fun and interactive presentation, consisting of a high-quality, curriculum-linked assembly using positive, science-based information to educate children about the importance of protecting biodiversity while highlighting diverse conservation initiatives across Canada.
The Earth Rangers School Assembly is not a one-off experience, but an inspirational introduction to a program that encourages lasting engagement. The biggest differentiator between it and other environmental education programs is the follow-up component of becoming a member, completely free of charge. The Earth Rangers Membership Program provides students with an engaging online experience and tangible activities that make an impact on real-life conservation projects and environmental initiatives. To participate in the membership program, students visit EarthRangers.com and register to become an Earth Ranger. Teachers can also continue to engage their classes in environmental education by accessing our classroom activities and curriculum resources.
Why is SFI involved?
Through youth education, Earth Rangers is effectively reaching kids across Canada with important messages about forest protection. The SFI segment in our 2017-18 assembly teaches students about the vital work SFI-supported scientists are undertaking in the boreal forest.
The segment also gives students the proper context for why balanced forest management is necessary, explaining how forests are both important wildlife habitat but are also necessary for building things like homes and schools and for making products like paper and pencils. Presenters then provide interesting details about the SFI-supported Boreal Avian Modeling Project, giving insight into the varied and unexpected habitat types that different bird species prefer.
How the project builds SFI community engagement
SFI will ensure Canadian SFI Implementation Committees are aware of Earth Rangers’ work and build connections for future collaboration opportunities. As with any environmental education program, SFI will also work closely with Earth Rangers to determine opportunities for future Project Learning Tree collaboration in Canada. SFI will also work with Earth Rangers to develop online materials related to the grant project, SFI, well-managed forests, and biodiversity.
Partners
This partnership includes educators and forestry professionals.
  • Project lead: Earth Rangers
  • Sustainable Forestry Initiative
Related information
  • Earth Rangers Canada’s work, including their Bring Back the Wild program, was featured in The Hamilton Spectator.
  • Project Learning Tree, an SFI program, is an award-winning environmental education program designed for teachers and other educators, parents, and community leaders working with youth from preschool through grade 12.
  • SFI connects youth to forests through education (project highlights).
  • Nature Conservancy of Canada, Earth Rangers and SFI Want to Make Life Less Scary for Amphibians at Halloween and All Year Round (media release).
  • The Boreal Avian Modelling Project
About Earth Rangers
Earth Rangers is the kids’ conservation organization, dedicated to educating children about biodiversity and conservation and empowering them to protect animals and their habitats. The Earth Rangers’ School Assembly Program is offered completely free of charge to elementary schools across Canada. It introduces students to four of the Earth Rangers Animal Ambassadors, including animals like Kateri the Peregrine Falcon, Gizmo the Eurasian Eagle Owl, and Quillow the Prehensile-tailed Porcupine. The 45‑minute assembly takes place in the school’s gym and features:
An immersive HD multimedia experience
Live Animal Ambassadors demonstrating their amazing natural behaviours
A fun and interactive game that gets students and teachers involved
Educational, curriculum-linked information appropriate for grades 1-6

EVANS LAKE FOREST EDUCATION SOCIETY

2011 Forest Education Symposium

Project Overview
In 2011, the Evans Lake Forest Education Society received $4,000 to host its Forest Education Symposium for educators at its center north of Vancouver, British Columbia. The Symposium, which occurred on October 21, 2011, brought together educators who want to teach balanced lessons about the economic, social and environmental benefits of sustainable forest management; and knowledgeable professionals, including Evans Lake Forest Education Centre staff and SFI representatives.
The symposium gave teachers and administrators tools to enrich forest education programs at their schools. They received a program package of up-to-date educational resources including suggested activities and locations, a chart linking activities to Prescribed Learning Outcomes, and other related resources. Each package included an electronic version so teachers can easily tailor the information to meet specific class needs. In addition to workshops and demonstration activities, participants were given and introduction to SFI certification hosted by the Western Canada SFI Implementation Committee.
Supporting the SFI Standard
This activity supports the SFI 2010-2014 Standard Objective 17: Community Involvement in the Practice of Sustainable Forestry, including Performance Measure 17.2 requiring that program participants support and promote public outreach, education and involvement related to sustainable forestry management.
Project Partners
The Evans Lake Forest Education Society worked in partnership with the Western Canada SFI Implementation Committee.
News
SFI Funds Community-based Education and Green Building Projects
Press Release – June 20, 2011
Project Resources
Project Overview PDF
About Evans Lake Forest Education Society
The Evans Lake Forest Education Society is a non-profit, charitable organization with a mandate to offer forest education programs at Evans Lake Forest Education Centre in Squamish, British Columbia. Surrounded by forest, it offers a feeling of wilderness seclusion but features all basic amenities. Each year, the Evans Lake Forest Education Centre offers a full summer camp program with sessions for campers aged 8-12 years, 13-16 years as well as Leadership Training Camps and wilderness based Outdoor Adventure Kamps (OAK).

FÉDÉRATION DES PRODUCTEURS FORESTIERS DU QUÉBEC (FPFQ)

Update of the “Sound Forestry Practices for Private Woodlots” Field Guide

Project Overview
The “Fédération des producteurs forestiers du Québec” (FPFQ) has released the fourth edition of the “Sound Forestry Practices for Private Woodlots Field Guide,” which is used by small woodlot owners and forest managers to promote responsible forest management. The updated guide was supported in part by a $10,000 SFI Community Partnerships Grant.
Download a copy of the guide (French only).
This newest edition includes enhanced content covering key themes such as identifying watercourse crossing features and wetlands, conservation of wildlife habitat, timber measurement and stacking for transport, sugarbush development and tree-felling safety regulations. The online version of the guide also features videos.
Within the province of Quebec, the guide is becoming an essential tool for implementing the requirements of the SFI Fiber Sourcing Standard, which requires manufacturers to reach out to landowners and to also ensure training of timber producers. The FPFQ Guide is commonly used by SFI Program Participants to help them address the standard’s requirements. On an annual basis, SFI Program Participants provide training to more than 300 woodlot owners and close to 550 forestry contractors and producers in Quebec.
Objective 2 of the 2015-2019 SFI Fiber Sourcing Standard seeks to broaden the practice of sustainable forestry through the use of best management practices to protect water quality. The FPFQ guide’s information on crossing streams and other water courses is an example of how it supports SFI’s approach to protecting water quality.
Objective 7 of the Standard aims to promote sustainable forestry through public outreach, education, and involvement and to support the efforts of SFI Implementation Committees. The guide embodies this educational approach.
Project Partners
In addition to the Fédération des producteurs forestiers du Québec, partners include 13 forest-related marketing boards in Quebec, the Quebec SFI Implementation Committee, Canadian forest service and the Fondation de la Faune du Québec (FFQ).
Completed Projects Short Videos
Stream Crossing
Wetland Identification
How to Become a Forest Producer
White Tail Deer Habitat Management
About Fédération des producteurs forestiers du Québec
The FPFQ is the provincial advocacy organization responsible for promoting the best interests of 130,000 woodlot owners. Its actions are focused on the protection and development of private woodlots.

FLORIDA SFI IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE

Teaching Sustainable Forestry to University Students through Project Learning Tree (PLT)

Project Description
The Florida SFI Implementation Committee received $5,000 funding PLT educator workshops for university students utilizing the theme of “sustainable forestry” using selected PLT lessons from current manuals. The project will fund workshops for the 2013-2014 school year.
Supporting the SFI Standard
The project will support SFI 2010-2014 Standard Objective 17: Community Involvement in the Practice of Sustainable Forestry, including Performance Measure 17.2 requiring that program participants support and promote public outreach, education and involvement related to sustainable forestry management.
Project Partners
In addition to the Florida SFI Implementation Committee and Florida Project Learning Tree, partners include U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Packaging Corporation of America, St. Petersburg College, Florida Forest Service, Leon County Extension and University of Florida.
About Florida SIC
The SFI program responds to local needs and issues across North America through 35 SFI Implementation Committees at the state, provincial or regional level. This unique grassroots network involves private landowners, independent loggers, forestry professionals, local governments agencies, academics, scientists, and conservationists.

THE FOREST FOUNDATION

Expansion of Map It, Manage It, Sustain It Forest Education Program

Project Overview
The Forest Foundation received $4,000 in 2011 to expand its Map It, Manage It, Sustain It Education Program, bringing together local landowners, forestry professionals, college faculty, and high schools in a collaborative learning environment.
SFI’s funding allowed The Foundation and its partners to expand the program to Plumas and Sierra Counties in California. The program enabled students to directly experience modern, technologically advanced forest management practices by combining tours of sawmills and forests certified to the SFI standard with hands-on field and classroom exercises.
The Map It, Manage It, Sustain It program cultivates tomorrow’s forest management professionals and informs the community on important topics related to modern methods of managing and sustaining California’s forests. The expansion allowed an additional 30 students and their teachers to explore ways in which forest managers plan for the long-term health and productivity of our forests, and to share their knowledge with their communities.
Supporting the SFI Standard
Map It, Manage It, Sustain It directly relates to SFI 2010-2014 Standard Objective 1: Forest Management Planning; Objective 2: Forest Productivity; Objective 16: Training and Education; and Objective 17: Community Involvement in the Practice of Sustainable Forestry. It also supports SFI requirements to protect water resources, conserve biological diversity, support forestry research and promote sustainable forest management on public lands.
Project Partners
In addition to The Forest Foundation, project partners included Sierra Pacific Industries and Soper-Wheeler Company. Partners making in-kind contributions include UC Berkeley Forestry Camp, University of California Cooperative Extension, and area high schools and colleges.
News
SFI Funds Community-based Education and Green Building Projects
Press Release – June 20, 2011
Project Resources
Project Overview PDF
About The Forest Foundation
The Forest Foundation is a non-profit organization created in 1994 to inform Californians, particularly K-12 students, about the role forests play in the environmental and economic health of our state. Its mission is to foster public understanding of forest ecosystems in California by providing balanced, science-based information on environmental, economic, and societal uses of forest resources for present and succeeding generations.

FOREST ONTARIO

SFI Is Helping Students and Teachers Get Firsthand Experience in the Boreal Forest

The Forestry Connects Program
Why this project matters
Ontario’s population is 86% urban, according to Statistics Canada. This means Ontario’s vast forests are outside the daily experiences of most Ontarians. SFI’s support for Forestry Connects, will help connect about 100 high school students and teachers to the boreal forest and give them real-life experience in responsible forest management.
Established in 2010, the Forestry Connects program, led by Forests Ontario, gives Ontario high school students a first-hand look at what it’s like to work in forestry. More than 350 students and teachers have participated in the program to go into Ontario’s forests to meet with foresters, operators, Indigenous people, and biologists to learn about growing and responsibly managing Ontario’s forests.
From visits to local mills and harvesting operations to lessons on local wildlife and the identification of different trees, the program demonstrates the importance of forests to local communities, and the complexity and benefits of active forest management and planning. By the end of the program, students have a better understanding of the integral role forests play in cleaning our air and water, regulating Ontario’s climate, and creating products we rely on every day, as well as inspiring potential careers in sustainable forest management.
Why is SFI involved?
SFI values this project because it provides students with firsthand experience that exposes them to real life experience in responsible forestry and connects them with resource professionals who may inspire them to pursue careers in forestry.
One of SFI’s priorities is to connect youth to forests through education. We look for ways to instill a lifelong appreciation for the value forests represent for biodiversity, the wider environment, sustainable communities, responsibly sourced forest products and for our shared quality of life. The educational focus of this project also supports SFI’s focus on encouraging the next generation of future forest leaders.
Our work with Girl Guides of Canada, Scouts Canada, Boy Scouts of America, and other youth organizations and school programs like Earth Rangers and Project Learning Tree helps build healthy kids. It also engages youth in conservation activities and outdoor education.
Our kids’ contact with nature keeps shrinking. Today’s emphasis on screen time and indoor play is also linked to psychological and physical effects like obesity, loneliness, depression and attention problems. Getting kids into forests and helping them learn about sustainability is good for forests and good for kids.
How the project builds SFI community engagement
This grant supports SFI’s community engagement efforts in two primary ways — it connects youth to forests and it serves to train and educate future forestry professionals. The Central Canada SFI Implementation Committee, which includes SFI Program Participants Domtar, EACOM, Resolute Forest Products and Weyerhauser, all with lands certified to SFI, is working with Forestry Connects to engage with schools in multiple communities. This is opening doors to students in Kenora, Dryden, Sioux Lookout, Ignace, Sioux Narrows, Winnipeg, Whitemouth and Falcon Lake.
Schools will participate in a one-to-two-day program taking them into the field to see active harvesting, learn hands on forestry skills like tree tagging and identification, and see finished wood products in order to understand the process from harvesting to product. Forests Ontario and their partners will develop a series of learning resources focused on forest management in Northern Ontario that will be freely accessible to teachers for use in the classroom. Resources will make knowledge of forest management accessible beyond Forestry Connects participants.
Partners
This partnership includes educators, conservationists, researchers, SFI Program Participants and municipal officials.
  • Project lead: Forests Ontario
  • Sustainable Forestry Initiative
  • Canadian Institute of Forestry
  • Central Canada SFI Implementation Committee (consisting of SFI Program Participants)
  • City of Kenora
  • Domtar (SFI Program Participant)
  • EACOM (SFI Program Participant)
  • FPInnovations
  • Resolute Forest Products (SFI Program Participant)
  • Weyerhauser (SFI Program Participant)
  • Manitoba Forestry Association
Related information
  • Read an op-ed about how Earth Rangers, an SFI-grantee, empowers children on environmental issues giving them opportunities to take action and to make a difference.
  • A marten monitoring project, supported by SFI, is connecting youth in the Cree First Nation of Waswanipi to the forest by bringing them on the trap line to monitor wildlife in an educational way, using scientific and traditional knowledge.
  • SFI supports Project Learning Tree an award-winning environmental education program designed for teachers and other educators, parents and community leaders working with youth from preschool through grade 12.
  • The Nature Conservancy is teaming up with SFI to help at-risk youth prepare for jobs as forest technicians, while restoring conservation values in native forests.
  • Forests Ontario
About Forests Ontario
Forests Ontario is dedicated to making Ontario’s forests greener. Its ambitious tree planting initiatives, extensive education programs, and decades of community outreach have helped plant millions of trees in the province each year — and it’s through these efforts that they are bringing our vision for healthier forests to a new generation of stewards, partners, teachers, and donors.

FORESTS ONTARIO

Ontario High Schoolers Experience the Forest

Forestry Connects – Timmins
Why this project matters
Ontario’s population is 86% urban, according to Statistics Canada. This means Ontario’s vast forests are outside the daily experiences of most Ontarians. SFI’s support for Forestry Connects, will help connect about 100 high school students and teachers to the boreal forest and give them real-life experience in responsible forest management.
Established in 2010, the Forestry Connects program, led by Forests Ontario, gives Ontario high school students a first-hand look at what it’s like to work in forestry. More than 350 students and teachers have participated in the program by going into Ontario’s forests to meet with foresters, operators, Indigenous people, and biologists to learn about growing and responsibly managing Ontario’s forests.
From visits to local mills and harvesting operations to lessons on local wildlife and the identification of different trees, the program demonstrates the importance of forests to local communities, and the complexity and benefits of active forest management and planning. By the end of the program, students have a better understanding of the integral role forests play in cleaning our air and water, regulating Ontario’s climate, and creating products we rely on every day, as well as inspiring potential careers in sustainable forest management.
Why is SFI involved?
SFI values this project because it provides students with firsthand experience that exposes them to real life experience in responsible forestry and connects them with resource professionals who may inspire them to pursue careers in forestry. Our kids’ contact with nature also keeps shrinking. Today’s emphasis on screen time and indoor play is also linked to psychological and physical effects like obesity, loneliness, depression and attention problems. Getting kids into forests and helping them learn about sustainability is good for forests and good for kids.
One of SFI’s priorities is to connect youth to forests through education. We look for ways to instill a lifelong appreciation for the value forests represent for biodiversity, the wider environment, sustainable communities, responsibly sourced forest products and for our shared quality of life. The educational focus of this project also supports SFI’s focus on encouraging the next generation of future forest leaders.
Our work with Scouts Canada, Boy Scouts of America, and other youth organizations and school programs like Earth Rangers and Project Learning Tree helps build healthy kids. It also engages youth in conservation activities and outdoor education.
How the project builds SFI community engagement
This grant supports SFI’s community engagement efforts in two primary ways — it connects youth to forests and it serves to train and educate future forestry professionals. The Central Canada SFI Implementation Committee, which includes SFI Program Participants Domtar, EACOM, Resolute Forest Products and Weyerhauser, all with lands certified to SFI, is working with Forestry Connects to engage with schools in multiple communities. This is opening doors to students in Northern Ontario.
Schools will participate in a one-to-two-day program taking them into the field to see active harvesting, learn hands-on forestry skills like tree tagging and identification, and see finished wood products in order to understand the process from harvesting to product. Forests Ontario and their partners will develop a series of learning resources focused on forest management in Northern Ontario that will be freely accessible to teachers for use in the classroom. Resources will make knowledge of forest management accessible beyond Forestry Connects participants.
Partners
This partnership includes educators, conservationists and SFI Program Participants.
  • Project lead: Forests Ontario
  • Sustainable Forestry Initiative
  • Central Canada SFI Implementation Committee
  • Domtar (SFI Program Participant)
  • EACOM (SFI Program Participant)
  • Resolute Forest Products (SFI Program Participant)
  • Weyerhauser (SFI Program Participant)
Related information
  • SFI helps students and teachers get firsthand experience in the boreal forest through the Forestry Connects Program.
  • Project Learning Tree, an SFI program, is an award-winning environmental education program designed for teachers and other educators, parents, and community leaders working with youth from preschool through grade 12.
  • The Nature Conservancy is teaming up with SFI to help at-risk youth prepare for jobs as forest technicians, while restoring conservation values in native forests.
  • SFI connects youth to forests through education (project highlights).
About Forests Ontario
Forests Ontario is dedicated to making Ontario’s forests greener. Its ambitious tree planting initiatives, extensive education programs, and decades of community outreach have helped plant millions of trees in the province each year — and it’s through these efforts that they are bringing our vision for healthier forests to a new generation of stewards, partners, teachers, and donors.

FRASER BASIN COUNCIL SOCIETY

SFI Is Bringing Indigenous Peoples, Sport Fishing Enthusiasts and Forest Managers Together to Help Thompson Steelhead

The Thompson Steelhead Community Collaboration Initiative
Why this project matters
Steelhead are an iconic symbol of the Thompson River and region in British Columbia. Having long sustained Indigenous people, steelhead are also central to the region’s world-class recreational fishery. Unfortunately, this salmonid species is in decline, and today Thompson Steelhead are classed as a species of extreme conservation concern by the provincial government.
A new initiative is underway for a recovery and management plan that will bring together multiple partners from across a diverse group of communities. This project, led by the Fraser Basin Council, will engage SFI Program Participants about how Indigenous peoples value steelhead, identify modified forest management practices and seek future opportunities to collaborate.
Why is SFI involved?
This initiative is designed to raise awareness and foster collaboration between Indigenous peoples, the commercial sport fishery and forest managers in the Thompson River watershed. Indigenous peoples have long relied on forests for cultural, spiritual and material needs.
SFI builds partnerships with Indigenous communities and the SFI 2015-2021 Forest Management Standard requires certificate holders to recognize and respect Indigenous peoples’ rights. This steelhead initiative supports this requirement. The initiative also supports SFI’s focus on supporting sustainable rural communities. The steelhead commercial fishery is an important source of income for communities in the Thompson River watershed.
How the project builds SFI community engagement
This grant supports SFI’s community engagement efforts in three primary ways. Training and educating current and future professionals, notably resource managers, is a key SFI community focus. This initiative directly engages forest management planners in addressing values that support steelhead habitat. SFI Program Participants BC Timber Sales, Stuwix Resources and West Fraser Mills are supporting these engagement efforts.
SFI’s commitment to support and promote Indigenous heritage values is directly addressed by the initiative’s plans to convey the importance of steelhead to the cultural and dietary requirements of the Nlaka’pamux and Secwepemc peoples.
A third SFI community value – supporting underserved communities through forestry – is addressed by helping recover steelhead populations, which will ultimately result in a return of a sport fishery for B.C. communities such as Spence’s Bridge. It is estimated that up to two-thirds of the economic value of the sport fishery in small communities such as Spence’s Bridge has been lost with the decline of steelhead over the last few decades.
Partners
This partnership includes Indigenous peoples, provincial government departments, conservationists and SFI Program Participants.
  • Project lead: Fraser Basin Council
  • Sustainable Forestry Initiative
  • BC Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations
  • BC Timber Sales (SFI Program Participant)
  • Cook’s Ferry Indian Band
  • Secwepemc Fisheries Commission
  • Stuwix Resources (SFI Program Participant)
  • West Fraser Mills (SFI Program Participant)
Related information
About Fraser Basin Council Society
The Fraser Basin Council (FBC) is a charitable non-profit society that brings people together to advance sustainability in the Fraser Basin and across British Columbia. Established in 1997, FBC is a collaboration of four orders of government (federal, provincial, local and First Nations), along with those from the private sector and civil society.
Over the past 16 years, FBC has helped people learn about sustainability, resolve conflicts, and roll out partnership initiatives with a focus on climate change and air quality, watersheds and water resources, and local sustainability and resilience. We support leaders in government, business and community organizations in finding collaborative solutions to tough issues and promising opportunities.

GREENWOOD HABITAT FOR HUMANITY

Habitat in Step with Sustainability

Project Overview
Forests not only provide habitat for wildlife, they provide the building materials that comprise our homes. While protecting wildlife habitat through sustainable management is integral to the SFI Standard, helping at-need individuals find shelter is an important value we also support. That’s why SFI Inc. is continuing to partner with Habitat for Humanity by providing $5,000 to support a sustainable and energy efficient home build. In addition to grant support, several SFI program participants will contribute as volunteers and the build will feature SFI certified building products. The Greenwood Habitat affiliate hosting the build will also explain the importance of SFI and sustainable forest management to volunteers participating in the build. This was also highlighted through an optional tour of Norbord’s OSB production facility where building products certified to the SFI standard are manufactured.
Supporting the SFI Standard
The project supports SFI 2010-2014 Standard Objective 17: Community Involvement in the Practice of Sustainable Forestry.
Project Partners
Greenwood Area Habitat for Humanity will partner with the South Carolina SFI Implementation Committee and a wide range of local community groups and SFI program participants.
Project Resources
Project Overview PDF
About Habitat for Humanity
Habitat for Humanity International is an ecumenical Christian organization founded in 1976 by a successful Georgia lawyer, Millard Fuller. As of the year 2006, Habitat has built more than 200,000 houses around the world, providing more than 1,000,000 people in more than 3,000 communities with safe, decent, affordable shelter.
In 1988, Tom Bryson, a retired county agent, collaborating with local citizens applied for and was granted affiliation. Since that time, Greenwood Area Habitat for Humanity (GAHFH) has served 72 families. Using volunteer labor and tax-deductible donations of money and materials, GAHFH constructs these homes with the help of partner families.

GEORGIA FORESTRY FOUNDATION

Getting Georgia Kids Reading and Learning about Forests

The Forever Tree
Why this project matters
Currently, two-thirds of Georgia’s third graders are not reading at grade level. Georgia’s working forests cover two-thirds of the state. This initiative, in partnership with the Governor’s Office and the Get Georgia Reading campaign seeks to connect children to forests by helping them learn to read.
Georgia’s First Lady Sandra Deal launched her Read Across Georgia initiative in support of Governor Nathan Deal’s goal of increasing the percentage of children reading at grade level by the end of third grade. The governor proclaimed March Read Across Georgia month to support this initiative.
Why is SFI involved?
The Georgia Forestry Foundation will leverage statewide partnerships, including the Georgia SFI Implementation Committee, to provide hands-on classroom activities teaching children about the importance of trees, through use of a book entitled The Forever Tree. The Georgia Forestry Foundation will use the book to enhance collaboration with Project Learning Tree (PLT), donate copies of the book to every elementary school in the state and all 401 public community libraries as well as including the book in afterschool programs with local community organizations.
This book also lends itself to serving as an icebreaker to engage more teachers and schools regarding the opportunities within PLT, an SFI program. PLT is an award-winning environmental education program designed for teachers and other educators, parents, and community leaders working with youth from preschool through grade 12.
How the project builds SFI community engagement
The fact that two-thirds of Georgia’s third-graders are not reading on grade level, brings long-term negative consequences to these children, their families, their communities, and the state. Unwilling to ignore the challenge of illiteracy in Georgia, hundreds of public and private leaders from across the state and across sectors have come together to take on third-grade reading as an urgent priority for all who care about children’s health and well-being. Together, they developed an agenda outlining the conditions necessary for every child in Georgia to become a proficient reader by the end of third grade, paving the way to improved outcomes throughout school and life.
Partners
This partnership includes educators and volunteers.
  • Project lead: Georgia Forestry Foundation
  • Sustainable Forestry Initiative
  • Get Georgia Reading
>Related information
  • Project Learning Tree, an SFI program, is an award-winning environmental education program designed for teachers and other educators, parents, and community leaders working with youth from preschool through grade 12.
  • SFI connects youth to forests through education (project highlights).
About the Georgia Forestry Foundation
The Georgia Forestry Foundation (GFF), established in 1990, is a 501 (c) (3) organization that acts as the educational arm of the Georgia Forestry Association. Their mission is to sustain Georgia’s forests through funding and support of leadership development, policy studies and education to enhance the economic, environmental and community value of working forests for Georgia. The Foundation has three pillars – Leadership; Policy Studies and Education. They work to develop leaders within the forestry community to be confident advocates at the government, business and community levels. They provide analysis and information that informs policy favorable to Georgia’s working forests, and develop educational experiences with a statewide focus that reach multiple target audiences.

GEORGIA HEIRS PROPERTY LAW CENTER

Helping Georgia Forestry Professionals Support Underserved Communities

Tangled Title and Timber: A Continuing Education Webinar on Heirs Property in Georgia
Why this project matters
Although African Americans had amassed 15 million acres/6 million hectares of land in the U.S. South between 1865 and 1919, today 97% of those lands have been lost, according to the Land Trust Alliance.
Understanding heirs’ property (aka tangled title) is critical to working with underserved communities. Developed by the Georgia Heirs Property Law Center, Southern Regional Extension Forestry, and SFI Georgia this free and publicly available webinar will explain how foresters can support heirs’ property owners to better manage their timber as an asset.
Heirs property is the untold story behind blight and generational poverty in Atlanta and throughout Georgia. Heirs property refers to a home or land that passes from generation to generation without a legally designated owner. This results in ownership being divided among all living descendants in a family. This unstable form of ownership limits a family’s ability to build generational wealth and hampers the efforts of nonprofits and cities to revitalize neighborhoods.
Why is SFI involved?
SFI is committed to identifying ways to support engaging African American forest owners in the U.S. South, including land retention. SFI, as an organization that stands for future forests, believes we can collaborate to help keep forests as forests and ensure that they are responsibly managed to provide conservation values as well as financial benefits to the African Americans who own these forestlands.
Forestry offers many older farmers, landowners not living on their land, and multiple generations of heirs who want to keep their land together, an opportunity to protect their land assets while generating income from their land. Managed forestry can help landowners prosper in retirement and through multiple generations. It can also be a powerful tool to help resolve heirs’ property issues and ownership questions and offers a means to help preserve the important social and cultural heritage of African American land ownership.
How the project builds SFI community engagement
Supporting engagement of underserved landowners connects well with SFI’s community engagement goals, specifically by training and educating current and future forestry practitioners and professionals. The project also supports underserved communities through forestry, with a focus on urban forestry, rural communities and minority landowners. And it demonstrates the conservation values of forests certified to SFI through community-related projects.
Through partnership and support of others operating effectively on these issues, and by using the natural strength of SFI Implementation Committees and our network of SFI Program Participants, SFI can become a vital piece of the solution to this important issue.  As such, SFI Inc. will fund this project to further our priority engagement on this important issue. SFI will work with the project leaders at the Georgia Heirs Property Law Center to incorporate content regarding the SFI small lands module into the webinar, as well as determine opportunities to leverage this work with other SFI Implementation Committees across the U.S. South.
Partners
This partnership includes legal experts, community activists, forestry professionals and conservationists.
  • Project lead: Georgia Heirs Property Law Center
  • Sustainable Forestry Initiative
  • Southern Regional Extension Forestry
  • Georgia SFI Implementation Committee
Related information
  • SFI is helping the Black Family Land Trust keep forestlands in the hands of African American families — A Tree, Is A Tree, Is A Tree 101.
  • The U.S. Endowment for Forestry and Communities received a 2014 SFI Conservation and Community Partnerships Grant to support African American forestland owners.
  • The U.S. Endowment for Forestry and Communities supports related work in multiple landscapes, including Southside Virginia.
About the Georgia Heirs Property Law Center
Recognizing the need for prevention, education, and remediation of heirs’ property led to the creation of the Georgia Heirs Property Law Center, Inc. The Center has served Georgia’s heirs’ property owners, nonprofits, and municipalities since 2015. The Center is a not-for-profit law firm dedicated to increasing generational wealth, social justice, and community stability by securing and preserving property rights of low- and moderate‑income Georgians. The Center’s services include title clearing, will creation, estate planning, and connecting clients with programs to increase the value of their land and homes. Staff travel throughout the state from offices in Atlanta, Athens, and Macon.

GEORGIA SFI IMPLEMENTATION COMMITTEE

Georgia Forestry Community Habitat for Humanity Build

Project Details
The Georgia SIC, along with landowners, industry, state agencies, foresters, loggers, and others, received $5,000 toward a Habitat for Humanity home build in Macon, GA. The home-build will be part of a video story of the forestry cycle from seedling to forest to mill to products and replanting to begin the cycle anew.
Supporting the SFI Standard
The project will support SFI 2010-2014 Standard Objective 17: Community Involvement in the Practice of Sustainable Forestry, including Performance Measure 17.2 requiring that program participants support and promote public outreach, education and involvement related to sustainable forestry management.
Project Partners
In addition to the Georgia SFI Implementation Committee, partners include Georgia Forestry Association Emerging Leaders; Georgia Forestry Commission; Georgia Forestry Foundation; Georgia Tree Farm Committee; Georgia Division-Society of American Foresters; and Southeastern Wood Producers Association.
About Georgia SIC
The SFI program responds to local needs and issues across North America through 35 SFI Implementation Committees at the state, provincial or regional level. This unique grassroots network involves private landowners, independent loggers, forestry professionals, local governments agencies, academics, scientists, and conservationists. The Georgia SFI Implementation Committee works behind the scenes supporting responsible forestry, wood procurement and harevsting in Georgia.

THE GREENING OF DETRIOT

Citizen Forester Program

Project Overview
Over the past several decades Detroit has lost tens of millions of trees due to resource constraints, urban expansion, Dutch Elm Disease and Emerald Ash Borer. As part of a comprehensive urban forest restoration effort SFI Inc. will provide $5,000 to support the Greening of Detroit’s 2014 Citizen Forester Program to recruit and train 50 new volunteer Citizen Foresters. The training program will inform participants about the SFI program and the importance of sustainable forest management and feature SFI-labeled products. The Citizen Foresters will then take on a leadership role in the subsequent tree plantings throughout Detroit as part of Greening of Detroit’s holistic approach to restore tree cover in a strategic manner providing a wide range of benefits to residents.
Supporting the SFI Standard
The Greening of Detroit’s Citizen Forester program supports the SFI program goals by strengthening sustainable forests, improving the sustainability of communities and addressing climate change. This grant directly addresses Objective 17: Community Involvement in the Practice of Sustainable Forestry and components of the SFI standard relating to aesthetics and recreation, and training and education.
Project Partners
The Greening of Detroit will partner with the Michigan SFI Implementation Committee.
Project Resources
Project Overview PDF
About Greening of Detroit
The Greening of Detroit is a well-established, nonprofit resource agency that partners with federal, state and local agencies, corporations and foundations to assist neighborhood groups, churches and schools in their efforts to improve the ecosystem in Detroit through tree planting projects, environmental education, urban agriculture, open space reclamation, vacant land management, and workforce development programs.
Transforming this city from a post-industrial urban center into a healthier, safer and greener environment will take commitment and a bold new way of thinking. We are ready for that challenge.

HARDWOOD FORESTRY FUND

Planting Hardwood Seedlings on Idle Agricultural Land in Devil’s Lake State Park, WI

Project Overview
The Hardwood Forestry Fund received $4,000 in 2011 to create opportunities for local residents to gain hands-on forest management experience while learning about the benefits of sustainable forestry through planting hardwood seedlings on idle agricultural land in Wisconsin’s Devil’s Lake State Park.
The 8.5-acre project involved planting 23,000 seedlings in order to restore hardwood forest cover in the park. Selected tree species were carefully matched to the site, including northern red oak, white oak, black walnut and cherry. As the plantings advance, they will close gaps in canopy coverage, creating habitat for species that require dense forest conditions to survive. Eventually these trees will reach maturity providing a sustainable wood source within the community.
Students from Youth Environmental Projects of Sauk County and their parents will monitor seedling success, interplant as needed, and prune the trees. This partnership introduces youth to the principles of sustainable forestry, allows them to have hands-on interaction and shows them the impact sustainable forestry has on forest-reliant communities.
Supporting the SFI Standard
This project supports SFI 2010-2014 Standard Objective 6: Protection of Special Sites; Objective 17: Community Involvement in the Practice of Sustainable Forestry, and Objective 18: Public Land Management Responsibilities. It also addresses multiple components of standard objectives related to sustainable forestry, forest productivity and health, protection of biological diversity, aesthetics and recreation, and training and education.
Project Partners
In addition to the Hardwood Forestry Fund, other partners included the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) Division of Forestry; WDNR Bureau of Parks & Recreation; WDNR State Nurseries Program; Sauk County Land Conservation Department and Youth Environmental Projects of Sauk County.
News
SFI Funds Community-based Education and Green Building Projects
Press Release – June 20, 2011
Project Resources
Project Overview PDF
About Hardwood Forestry Fund
The Hardwood Forestry Fund is a 501(c)(3) educational organization dedicated to establishing sustainable hardwood forests. Through tree planting and implementation of forest management techniques on public land, the Hardwood Forestry Fund has promoted hardwood timber growth, management, environmental education, and wise use of renewable forest resources since 1990. Trees planted by the Hardwood Forestry Fund require a management plan that ensures they will be cared for to provide quality natural resources for future generations. Educational and demonstration forests help teach students and private landowners how to establish and maintain hardwood forests.

IDAHO FOREST FOUNDATION

Sustainable Forestry Teacher Tour 2013

Project Overview
Through the Sustainable Forestry Tour, educators are exposed to the Project Learning Tree (PLT) curriculum and the social, economic, and ecological aspects of sustainable forestry. They are immersed in sustainable forestry issues with valuable information and concepts they can take back to their classrooms. During the three-day program educators visit private, state, and federal forests; tour sawmills and active harvesting operations; and learn about forests directly from natural resource professionals.
Supporting the SFI Standard
The project will support SFI 2010-2014 Standard Objective 17: Community Involvement in the Practice of Sustainable Forestry, including Performance Measure 17.2 requiring that program participants support and promote public outreach, education and involvement related to sustainable forestry management.
Project Partners
In addition to the Idaho Forest Foundation, partners include the Idaho SFI Implementation Committee.
About Idaho Forest Foundation
The Idaho Forest Foundation supports forest education and outreach projects that have a lasting impact in Idaho. Foundation funds will help reach more people and provide more forest education programs throughout the state.

INSIDE EDUCATION SOCIETY OF ALBERTA

Alberta School Children See Forest Management In Action

Student Forestry Field Trips
Why this project matters
The Inside Education Society of Alberta will deliver forestry education field trips to more than 3,500 Alberta students, teachers and parents at five field sites across Alberta. These engaging, interactive day trips will connect young people to the natural world and will connect them in a meaningful way to sustainable forest management. This program will provide kids in grades 4-12 with real-world insight into sustainable forest management in Alberta. The program will affect urban and rural students and students from Indigenous communities. For many students, this will be their first opportunity to visit a working forest.
The Student Forestry Field Trips project, proposed by Inside Education, is a valuable way to get kids in the forest, learning about sustainable forest management first hand. They will learn about a variety of sustainable forest management themes — including various forestry cutblocks and regeneration sites, and wetland and wildlife habitat conservation.
Why is SFI involved?
One of SFI’s priorities is to connect youth to forests through education. We look for ways to instill a lifelong appreciation for the value forests represent for biodiversity, the wider environment, sustainable communities, responsibly sourced forest products and for our shared quality of life. The educational focus of this project also supports SFI’s focus on encouraging the next generation of future forest leaders.
SFI Program Participants will provide demonstrations of forest management activities, in addition to offering mill tours for the students and teachers. SFI will work with Inside Education and SFI Program Participants Millar Western and West Fraser to feature aspects of the SFI Program throughout the tours, from best management practices at the Des Crossley Demonstration Forest and active harvesting and reforestation activities on the Huestis Demonstration Forest. SFI will also provide teachers with Project Learning Tree curriculum.
How the project builds SFI community engagement
Inside Education works closely with partner organizations to develop and deliver field trips. They have formalized partnerships with forestry companies local to the communities in which they operate, including SFI Program Participants Millar Western Forest Products and West Fraser, dba Sundre Forest Products. The project also involves collaboration with the Government of Alberta for program site maintenance, as each of the sites exists on Alberta Government crown land. There are further partnership opportunities in forestry careers education with the Alberta Forest Products Association and its Work Wild program. Inside Education also collaborates with CAREERS the Next Generation as part of the Alberta Forestry Futures Partnership.
Partners
This partnership includes educators, forestry professionals, SFI Program Participants and government officials.
  • Project lead: Inside Education Society of Alberta
  • Sustainable Forestry Initiative
  • Millar Western Forest Products (SFI Program Participant)
  • West Fraser, dba Sundre Forest Products (SFI Program Participant)
  • Alberta Forest Products Association
  • Alberta Environment and Parks
Related information
  • SFI helps students and teachers get firsthand experience in the boreal forest through the Forestry Connects Program.
  • Project Learning Tree, an SFI program, is an award-winning environmental education program designed for teachers and other educators, parents, and community leaders working with youth from preschool through grade 12.
  • SFI connects youth to forests through education (project highlights).
About the Inside Education Society of Alberta
This Alberta charity brings together people and organizations with a wide variety of views on environmental issues to work together with education as the starting point. The Inside Education Society of Alberta helps teachers and students better understand the science, technology and issues related to our environment and natural resources. Each year staff and volunteers visit over 20,000 students, work directly with more than 1,500 teachers and travel thousands of kilometres to communities across Alberta working towards a vision of engaged stewards of the environment and natural resources.

LAUDERDALE COUNTY HABITAT FOR HUMANITY

Sponsor Home in Lauderdale County Certified to National Green Building Standard

Project Overview
Lauderdale County Habitat for Humanity received $3,500 in 2011 to pay part of the cost of a Habitat for Humanity home certified to the ANSI ICC 700 National Green Building Standard using SFI-certified products.
The Mississippi based project promoted the value of SFI certification and the ANSI National Green Building Standard. The project involved youth groups such as Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts and 4-H helping develop future volunteers for Habitat while promoting the value of the forest industry.
Supporting the SFI Standard
The project supports SFI 2010-2014 Standard Objective 17: Community Involvement in the Practice of Sustainable Forestry.
Project Partners
In addition to Lauderdale County Habitat for Humanity, partners included the Mississippi SFI Implementation Committee and other members of the Mississippi forest industry.
News
SFI Funds Community-based Education and Green Building Projects
Press Release – June 20, 2011
Project Resources
Project Overview PDF
About Lauderdale County Habitat for Humanity
Lauderdale County Habitat for Humanity is an affiliate of Habitat for Humanity International, a non-profit, ecumenical Christian organization committed to providing families with the life-changing opportunity to purchase and own decent, affordable homes. Habitat for Humanity builds homes for hard-working, low-income people, and future homeowners put in hundreds of hours of sweat equity, share the labor of homebuilding, and participate in valuable training and preparation sessions. In return, their lives are transformed by the positive experience of working with their community in building their home, and the many benefits that come from having a place to call home.

MANITOBA FORESTRY ASSOCIATION

Sandilands Forest Discovery Centre (SFDC) Education Trail Repair and Updating

Project Overview
Forests provide a wide range of values from clean air and water to wildlife habitat to wood products; they also provide equally important recreational and educational opportunities. As part of SFI Inc.’s commitment to enhancing these opportunities, the Manitoba Forestry Association (MFA) will receive $5,000 to repair and improve three interpretive educational trails in the Sandilands Forest Discovery Centre (SFDC) forest. While this project will allow MFA to complete much needed safety improvements following natural disturbance events, it will also update the interpretive and educational content associated with the trails. A new trail guide will also be published discussing fire ecology, resource management and the role SFI plays in sustainable forestry. Additionally the new trail system will be utilized in the Manitoba Envirothon, an annual hands-on environmental education competition for high school students, designed to encourage team work, problem-solving skills, and public speaking skills while fostering an appreciation of environmental issues.
Supporting the SFI Standard
The project will support many aspects of the SFI 2010-2014 Standard including Objective 5: Management of visual quality and recreational benefits; Objective 6: Protection of special sites; Objective 16: Training and education; and Objective 17: Community Involvement in the Practice of Sustainable Forestry.
Project Partners
Project partners include: LumberOne Building Products Ltd., Pineland Forest Nursery, and Agassiz Chainsaw Sculptors & Timbermen.
Project Resources
Project Overview PDF
About Manitoba Forestry Association
As Manitoba’s oldest conservation education organization, the Manitoba Forestry Association (MFA) is a leader in the field of forest education. Our mission is to inform and educate all Manitobans about wise management of trees and forests, to ensure they will remain healthy and productive not only for today, but for future generations.

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY’S FOREST CARBON AND CLIMATE PROGRAM

E-Learning Unit on Carbon and Climate Benefits in Well-Managed Forests

Supporting the Forest Carbon and Climate Program: Specialized Course Content and Participant Sponsorship
Why this project matters
Michigan State University’s Forest Carbon and Climate Program will work in partnership with SFI to develop robust e-learning content explicitly linking working certified forests with carbon management and associated climate benefits and delivering the learning materials to a diverse pool of participants. Increased access to education on topics of forest carbon management and climate change mitigation will increase the demand for certification and certified sustainable products.
This project will extend the benefits of certification and certified products to underserved, remote, and tribal communities, including family forestlands. It will also play a role in connecting families to forests across multiple generations by developing a connection between sustainable communities and housing development activities, sourcing certified forest products, and the growing interest and concern about climate change.
Why is SFI involved?
The standalone module will be an important and flexible learning tool teachers can leverage in secondary classrooms to engage and educate youth. This will strengthen understanding and appreciation of the ecological services forests provide, including sustainable wood products, carbon storage, and other co‑benefits.
One of SFI’s priorities is to connect youth to forests through education. We look for ways to instill a lifelong appreciation for the value forests represent for biodiversity, the wider environment, sustainable communities, responsibly sourced forest products and for our shared quality of life. The educational focus of this project also supports SFI’s focus on encouraging the next generation of future forest leaders.
SFI is also committed to enhancing our understanding of the role that forest play in carbon storage. To facilitate good decision-making, and to help make the case for the value of sustainability, the SFI Conservation Impact Project is working to quantify the conservation benefits of SFI’s work, and the connection between sustainable supply chains and important conservation outcomes. By clarifying these conservation attributes, SFI will help make the link between well-managed forests and the public benefits, like carbon storage, that affect each of us every day.
How the project builds SFI community engagement
The Forest Carbon and Climate Program has established a relationship with the Michigan SFI Implementation Committee to link the proposed project activities with local SFI networks, outreach efforts, and community-based activities. The incentives to measure conservation values are diverse and serve to build connections between brand owners seeking to understand the impact of their supply chain sourcing. Measuring conservation values also helps conservation stakeholders engage more effectively with SFI if they understand the values that certification can provide. Improved tracking will also better equip SFI to provide sustainability related metrics and contribute meaningfully to conservation outcomes.
Partners
This partnership includes academics, forestry professionals and SFI Program Participants.
  • Project lead: Michigan State University’s Forest Carbon and Climate Program
  • Sustainable Forestry Initiative
  • Weyerhaeuser (SFI Program Participant)
  • International Paper (SFI Program Participant)
  • Michigan SFI Implementation Committee
  • Society of American Foresters
  • Michigan Forest Biomaterials Institute
Related information
  • SFI launches Conservation Impact Project to deliver metrics for well-managed forests (media release).
  • Conservation at SFI (fact sheet).
About the Michigan State University’s Forest Carbon and Climate Program
Michigan State University’s Forest Carbon and Climate Program aims to increase understanding and implementation of climate-smart forest management, which inextricably links climate change mitigation and adaptation. The program focuses on activities that advance best practice implementation, promote robust and inter-disciplinary understanding of forest benefits and co-benefits, and develop and nurture balanced perspectives that include working forests and forest products as a part of the climate change solution. These objectives are achieved through working with strategic partners to better communicate and bring attention to key topics, create educational content and programming, and bridge dialogue gaps on carbon and climate topics related to forests and forested lands.

MINNESOTA SIC

Sustainable Forestry Initiative Video and Informational Kiosk at the Minnesota Historical Society’s Forestry History Center

Project Overview
The MN SIC received $5,000 to fund a partnership with the MN Historical Society to develop an educational kiosk that will target 4,000 students visiting the Forest History Center each year. The kiosk will consist of a 5-minute video about the SFI® program and display of SFI labeled products.
Supporting the SFI Standard
The project will support SFI 2010-2014 Standard Objective 17: Community Involvement in the Practice of Sustainable Forestry, including Performance Measure 17.2 requiring that program participants support and promote public outreach, education and involvement related to sustainable forestry management.
Project Partners
In addition to the Minnesota SFI Implementation Committee, partners include the Minnesota Historical Society, Forest History Center.
About Minnesota SIC
The SFI program responds to local needs and issues across North America through 35 SFI Implementation Committees at the state, provincial or regional level. This unique grassroots network involves private landowners, independent loggers, forestry professionals, local governments agencies, academics, scientists, and conservationists. The Minnesota SFI Implementation Committee includes representatives from the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, forest companies, the University of Minnesota, family forest owners, the Minnesota Logger Education Program, Minnesota Timber Producers Association, the Ruffed Grouse Society and SFI-certified county land departments.

MISSISSIPPI FORESTRY FOUNDATION

TIMB(R): Timber Innovations for Mississippi Buildings Reimagined

Project Overview
The Mississippi Forestry Foundation’s project will educate university students and architects in the value and benefits of building with wood by programming and designing a state-of-the-art wood structure for public outreach and education. The project will receive a $10,000 grant from SFI Inc. The building design will demonstrate innovative solid-timber construction and the sustainable practices learned by the students throughout the semester.
Project Partners
In addition to the Mississippi Forestry Foundation, partners include Mississippi State University College of Architecture Art and Design, Mississippi State University Department of Sustainable Bioproducts and Plum Creek.
Click here to read more on the TIMBR Project.
About Mississippi Forestry Foundation
The Mississippi Forestry Foundation was established in 1964 by the Mississippi Forestry Association to promote and carry out educational, literary, scientific, and charitable programs to better conserve, develop, and protect the forest and related natural resources of Mississippi for the best interest of this and future generations.

MISSISSIPPI SIC

Sponsor Competition in FFA and 4-H Forestry Contests

Project Overview
The Mississippi SFI Implementation Committee received $3,000 in 2011 to sponsor incentives for team competition in FFA and 4-H forestry contests to promote awareness of sustainable forestry among students and their leaders, educators and advisors.
Youth involved in FFA and 4-H forestry programs were taught basic forestry principles and practices facilitating increased appreciation for sustainable forestry and SFI certification. This project stimulated a connection between youth forestry programs and the Mississippi forestry community while providing important public outreach.
Supporting the SFI Standard
This project supports SFI 2010-2014 Standard Objective 17: Community Involvement in the Practice of Sustainable Forestry, including Performance Measure 17.2 requiring that program participants support and promote public outreach, education and involvement related to sustainable forestry management.
Project Partners
Members of the Mississippi SFI Implementation Committee include forest companies, private landowners, independent loggers, forestry professionals, local government agencies, academics, scientists, and conservationists.
News
SFI Funds Community-based Education and Green Building Projects
Press Release – June 20, 2011
Project Resources
Project Overview PDF
About Mississippi SIC
The SFI program responds to local needs and issues across North America through 35 SFI Implementation Committees at the state, provincial or regional level. This unique grassroots network involves private landowners, independent loggers, forestry professionals, local government agencies, academics, scientists, and conservationists. The Mississippi SFI Implementation Committee has 49 members representing forest industries, environmental groups, consulting foresters, conservation agencies, Mississippi State University, and non-industrial forest owners. It is a strong supporter of landowner and logger education, youth forestry programs, teacher workshops, and public outreach and communications. The Mississippi SFI Implementation Committee also supports Habitat for Humanity, Tree Farm Program, and a forestry exhibit in the new Mississippi Children’s Museum, which reaches 250,000 people annually.

NATIONAL NETWORK OF FOREST PRACTITIONERS

Engaging Underserved Landowners in Alabama and Mississippi

Project Description
This project received $5,000 funding for outreach to, engage, educate, and support 120 minority and underserved landowners in counties with high African American land ownership. The focus will be to transition 20 landowners with “neglected” woodlands toward forest management and certification to increase their benefits from their woodlands and conserve environmental quality.
Supporting the SFI Standard
The project will support SFI 2010-2014 Standard Objective 1: Forest Management Planning and Objective 17: Community Involvement in the Practice of Sustainable Forestry, including Performance Measure 17.2 requiring that program participants support and promote public outreach, education and involvement related to sustainable forestry management.
About National Network of Forest Practitioners
The National Network of Forest Practioners promotes the mutual well being of workers, rural communities, and forests by supporting individuals and groups that build sustainable relationships between forests and people.

NATIONAL WILD TURKEY FEDERATION

Connecting Forests to the Community

Project Overview
The NWTF will create an education curriculum to help all levels of the community learn, interact, care and appreciate forest resources through sustainable practices and land stewardship. NWTF will accomplish this goal through hands-on and interactive activities, demonstration areas, classwork, training, education tools and special events. The program will receive SFI community grant funding of $10,000 in 2016 and 2017.
Project Partners
In addition to the National Wild Turkey Federation, partners include Bayer Crop Sciences, the U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service, private donors, South Carolina Forestry Commission and Roundstone Native Seed.
About National Wild Turkey Federation
When the National Wild Turkey Federation was founded in 1973, there were about 1.5 million wild turkeys in North America. After decades of dedicated work, that number hit an historic high of almost 7 million turkeys thanks to the tremendous efforts of dedicated volunteers, professional staff and committed partners. The NWTF seeks to conserve or enhance 4 million acres of critical upland habitat and to open access to 500,000 additional acres for public recreation and hunting.

NORTHWEST NATURAL RESOURCES INSTITUTE

Support Natural Resources Teacher Workshop

Project Overview
Northwest Natural Resources Institute received $4,200 in 2011 to support their annual K-12 Natural Resources Teacher Workshop in Spokane, WA.
A portion of the workshop was dedicated to informing teachers about the care and attention forestry professionals give to being good stewards of forestlands; providing an opportunity to learn forestry skills from foresters; and showcasing SFI-certified management, procurement, and product manufacturing.
Educators were exposed to harvesting activities and the extensive management planning taking place within a forest certified to the SFI Standard, as well as the planning and regulatory requirements involved in reforestation, growth and yield, stand tending, best management practices and road building. Participants then toured lands and manufacturing facilities certified to the SFI Standard. Additionally participants were required to fill out an evaluation form with the information collected being used to improve future workshops.
Supporting the SFI Standard
This project supports SFI 2010-2014 Standard Objective 17: Community Involvement in the Practice of Sustainable Forestry, including Performance Measure 17.2 requiring that program participants support and promote public outreach, education and involvement related to sustainable forest management.
Project Partners
Partners included Forest Capital Partners LLC and Boise Cascade LLC.
News
SFI Funds Community-based Education and Green Building Projects
Press Release – June 20, 2011
Project Resources
Project Overview PDF
About Northwest Natural Resources Institute
The mission of the Northwest Natural Resources Institute is to cultivate a better understanding of the daily importance of forest, agricultural, mineral, forest and water resources by educating teachers and students in Washington State about the science, economic and societal aspects of the region’s natural resources. It accomplishes this through educational programs.

NORTHERN CALIFORNIA SOCIETY OF AMERICAN FORESTERS

2014 Forestry Institute for Teachers Field Trips

Project Overview
While environmental education is paramount to providing students a well rounded appreciation of nature, many schools lack the proper training and resources to offer it. To help fill this gap, SFI Inc. will provide the Northern California Society of American Foresters with $5,000 to coordinate four Forestry Institute for Teachers (FIT) sessions. Each session entails an intensive six-day field workshop for K-12th grade teachers focused on forestry, ecology and how to explain these topics in the classroom. The program includes hands-on activities where teachers learn from resource professionals from all perspectives of forestry, including industrial companies, non-industrial private land owners, federal and state agencies, and forest advocates. The FIT sessions are designed to give teachers the training and tools they need to connect forest management to forest health back in their classrooms. Teachers are also provided with a $200 stipend for use in developing environmental and forestry related curriculums.
Supporting the SFI Standard
The project is aligned with Objective 17, “Community Involvement in the Practice of Sustainable Forestry”, Performance Measure 17.2, which includes “periodic educational opportunities promoting sustainable forestry, such as field tours, seminars, websites, webinars, or workshops; educational trips”.
Project Partners
The Northern California Society of American Foresters will partner with California Project Learning Tree; University of California Cooperative Extension; University of California-Davis; California Department of Fish and Wildlife (ProjectWILD); and Sierra Pacific Industries.
Project Resources
Project Overview PDF
About Northern California Society of American Foresters
The Northern California Society of American Foresters, with about 900 members, is a unit of the Society of American Foresters (Est. 1900), with about 18,000 members. The Society is a national organization representing all segments of the forestry profession in the United States . It includes public and private practitioners, researchers, administrators, educators, and forestry students. The mission of the Society is to advance the science, education, technology, and practice of forestry and to use the knowledge, skills, and conservation ethic of the profession to ensure the continued health and use of forest ecosystems, and the present and future availability of forest resources to benefit society.
About Forestry Institute for Teachers
The Forestry Institute for Teachers is a multi-day residence workshop developed by the Northern California Society of American Foresters, University of California Cooperative Extension, Shasta County Office of Education, The California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection, and Project Learning Tree. The FIT Program is underwritten by a consortium of public and private sources. Since 1993, over 2,100 teachers have graduated from the program.
The goal of FIT is to provide K-12 teachers with knowledge, skills and tools to effectively teach their students about forest ecology and forest resource management practices. The program brings together natural resource specialists and teachers from rural and urban settings for one week, working side by side to gain a deeper understanding of forest ecosystems and human use of natural resources.

NORTHERN CALIFORNIA SOCIETY FOR AMERICAN FORESTERS

Teachers Across California Gain Valuable Forest Science Knowledge

Forestry Institute for Teachers
Why this project matters
Forestry Institute for Teachers (FIT) is an intensive six-day field workshop for K-12 grade teachers. The project will connect teachers with resource professionals who have a deep understanding of the importance of forestry on environmental, social and economic scales. The program is offered at four locations throughout California and includes hands-on fieldtrips for teachers to learn about forest science, management, and conservation from federal, state, environmental, forestry and advocacy professionals.
The FIT Program is underwritten by a consortium of public and private sources. Since 1993, over 2,100 teachers have graduated from the program. FIT engages teachers by focusing on natural resource education strategies through partners like Project Learning Tree (PLT), which is an SFI program. PLT uses trees and forests as windows on the world to increase students’ understanding of the environment and actions they can take to conserve it. Partners will work with Northern California Society of American Foresters to identify and coordinate local forest products industry participation in the program, including field and mill site tours.
Why is SFI involved?
SFI values this project because it provides teachers with firsthand experience that exposes them to real‑life experiences in responsible forestry. FIT leverages resource specialists from conservation groups, state agencies, private industry and the California SFI Implementation Committee to inform teachers about the environmental values associated with well‑managed forests. FIT also provides a comprehensive understanding of the forest products process. In addition to the complex regulatory requirements of California forest practice rules and SFI certification programs, FIT instructs participants on how wildfire, erosion, fisheries, and invasive species issues are mitigated in well-managed forests.
Certification of completion for FIT is contingent on participants developing a course curriculum project. The program requires that participants incorporate their subject material with PLT activities into a multi‑week teaching plan. FIT will promote the application of natural resource knowledge through implementation of the curriculum project. Participants are encouraged to implement the curriculum project in their classroom and provide documentation to FIT. Successful curriculum projects will be adopted as case studies for future FIT sessions to support teachers in developing robust activities.
How the project builds SFI community engagement
By focusing on educators from urban environments who have limited opportunities to interact with forest ecosystems, FIT strengthens ties between teachers and well‑managed forests. FIT leverages experts from the research and management arm of the University of California and the USDA Forest Service to provide the most current and tested knowledge regarding proper forest management. In addition, FIT partners with the SFI community through Sierra Pacific Industries, a long time SFI Program Participant, the California SFI Implementation Committee and California Project Learning Tree.
Partners
This partnership includes educators, conservationists, researchers, SFI Program Participants and Forestry and natural resource professionals.
  • Project lead: Northern California Society of American Foresters
  • Sustainable Forestry Initiative
  • California Project Learning Tree
  • University of California Cooperative Extension
  • Sierra Pacific Industries (SFI Program Participant)
  • California SFI Implementation Committee
Related information
  • SFI helps students and teachers get firsthand experience in the boreal forest through the Forestry Connects Program.
  • Project Learning Tree, an SFI program, is an award-winning environmental education program designed for teachers and other educators, parents, and community leaders working with youth from preschool through grade 12.
  • SFI connects youth to forests through education (project highlights).
About the Northern California Society for American Foresters
The Northern California Society of American Foresters, with about 900 members, is a unit of the Society of American Foresters. Established in 1900, SAF has about 18,000 members. SAF is a national organization representing all segments of the forestry profession in the United States. It includes public and private practitioners, researchers, administrators, educators, and forestry students. The mission of SAF is to advance the science, education, technology, and practice of forestry and to use the knowledge, skills, and conservation ethic of the profession to ensure the continued health and use of forest ecosystems, and the present and future availability of forest resources to benefit society.

PACIFIC EDUCATION INSTITUTE

STEM Education of Sustainable Forest Practices

Project Overview
Sustainable forest management and conservation are essential parts to preserving forests for the future. For students to connect these ideas, first their teachers need to understand the issues too. That’s why SFI Inc. is providing the Pacific Education Institute $5,000 to host a sustainable forestry workshop for both science education professors who train future teachers and educators at environmental learning centers who facilitate Project Learning Tree (PLT). The workshop will include PLT’s Focus on Forests and Forests of the World modules with added material about the SFI Program. The workshop will include a SFI certified forest owner and a nearby forest analysis. This will allow participants to train other teachers about the importance of sustainable forestry and how the SFI Standard helps conserve the environmental, social, and economic values forests provide us. Graduating teachers will also be encouraged to access SFI or American Tree Farm System Forests for student field trips and other projects required by the national Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS).
Supporting the SFI Standard
The project will support SFI 2010-2014 Standard Objective 17: Community Involvement in the Practice of Sustainable Forestry, including Performance Measure 17.2 requiring that program participants support and promote public outreach, education and involvement related to sustainable forestry management.
Project Partners
Washington Forest Protection Association
Project Resources
Project Overview PDF
About Pacific Education Institute
The Pacific Education Institute (PEI) expands students’ opportunities to learn in outdoor settings throughout Washington State. Students apply math, science, the arts, and social studies skills to field investigations both out-of-doors and in their classrooms. PEI’s rigorous research-based approach assures that students are “learning by doing”.

PACIFIC EDUCATION INSTITUTE

Forestry-based STEM Professional Development for Teachers in Washington State

Forestry Connections for K-12 Teachers
Why this project matters
Sustainable forest management and conservation are essential to preserving forests for the future. For students to make this connection, first their teachers need to understand the issues too. The Pacific Education Institute seeks to elevate and enrich the link between people and forests, by working directly with teachers who work with students. This project will deepen the integration of forestry education for existing and in-training K-12 teachers. As the leading organization in Washington providing field-based science, technology, education and math (STEM) professional development for teachers, the Pacific Education Institute is ideally positioned to encourage educators to explore the links between forestry and STEM-connected education.
Project outcomes will be shared with school districts, the SFI Washington State Implementation Committee (SIC), Project Learning Tree, and other partner organizations, including universities. In addition, SFI and PLT will highlight this project is an example of SIC-PLT collaboration opportunities, and ensure information is shared broadly with all SFI Implementation Committees and state PLT network members.
Why is SFI involved?
This project relates most closely to two of SFI’s specific focal areas: training and educating current and future practitioners who are engaged in actions affecting our forests; and supporting teachers in engaging and educating youth to encourage understanding, appreciation and hands-on interaction with the natural world.
The Pacific Education Institute will provide high-quality PLT training to student teachers at several Washington universities. Project Learning Tree, an SFI program, is an award-winning environmental education program designed for teachers and other educators, parents, and community leaders working with youth from preschool through grade 12. The Pacific Education Institute will also work with Green Diamond Resources in Mason County, an SFI Program Participant, as well as all fifth‑grade teachers in the county to facilitate a PLT training and a tour of Green Diamond’s forests, which are certified to SFI. The project will include SFI certification practices and awareness in forestry tours.
How the project builds SFI community engagement
The Pacific Education Institute works closely with the Shelton School District where the focus for fifth grade is forests and where each year they use the institute’s Forest Benefits and Forest Management lessons. This project will broaden and deepen the understanding of how to use PLT in tandem with an SIC-member-hosted field experience. Once this project is complete, the Pacific Education Institute will work with the SFI Washington State Implementation Committee to identify other landowners who wish to do this work locally with their schools.
Partners
This partnership includes educators, conservationists, researchers, SFI Program Participants and forestry and natural resource professionals.
  • Project lead: Pacific Education Institute
  • Sustainable Forestry Initiative
  • Green Diamond Resources Co. (SFI Program Participant)
  • Washington State SFI Implementation Committee
Related information
About the Pacific Education Institute
The Pacific Education Institute expands students’ opportunities to learn in outdoor settings throughout Washington State. Students apply math, science, the arts, and social studies skills to field investigations both out-of-doors and in their classrooms. The institute’s rigorous research-based approach assures that students are learning by doing.

PARKS & PEOPLE FOUNDATION

Helping at-risk youth connect with outdoor education in the Gwynns Falls/Leakin Park Forest

Project Overview
Parks & People’s in-school and after-school environmental education program, the green workforce development program, and SuperKids summer camp use green spaces in the Gwynns Falls/Leakin Park urban forest located in Baltimore, MD to teach elementary and middle school youth the importance of environmental stewardship. Parks & People Foundation will receive $10,000 to support the program’s curriculum-building resources.
This funding will help low-income urban students access parks and the Gwynns Falls/Leakin Park urban forest, ultimately strengthening their ties to the forest and nature. The programs are aligned with the Maryland State Department of Education’s environmental literacy standards and will also use Project Learning Tree resources and other educational materials.
The students will gain knowledge about the Sustainable Forestry Initiative’s focus on responsible forest management and how a healthy forest impacts the community. Students will reflect and share insight on their effect on the environment and how they can become better stewards of green spaces around their community. Students will emerge from these programs with a deeper respect for the natural world and all the benefits it brings.
Project Partners
In addition to the Parks & People Foundation, partners include the Baltimore Department of Recreation and Parks and the Baltimore Ecosystem Study.
About Parks & People Foundation
The Parks & People Foundation is dedicated to supporting a wide range of recreational and educational opportunities; creating and sustaining beautiful and lively parks; and promoting a healthy natural environment for Baltimore. On May 20, 2015, people in Baltimore, including from the Parks & People Foundation, contributed to a new Guinness world record for the most trees planted in one hour.

PHILMONT SCOUT RANCH

Philmont Visiting Forester Program Development

Project Description
The Philmont Scout Ranch received $5,000 for the Visiting Foresters Program. Visiting Foresters will teach sustainable forest management principles and skills to over 5,000 youth visiting Philmont Scout Ranch’s Demonstration Forest in 2013. Participating youth will gain hands on forestry education and experience from national forestry experts and will be able to apply this new knowledge on Philmont’s SFI certified forest.
Supporting the SFI Standard
The project will support SFI 2010-2014 Standard Objective 5: Management of Visual Quality and Recreational Benefits; Objective 16: Training and Education and Objective 17: Community Involvement in the Practice of Sustainable Forestry, including Performance Measure 17.2 requiring that program participants support and promote public outreach, education and involvement related to sustainable forestry management.
Project Partners
In addition to the Boy Scouts of America’s Philmont Scout Ranch, partners include the New Mexico Energy, Minerals, and Natural Resources Department; Forest Guild; Southwest Society of American Foresters; New Mexico Tree Farm Committee.
About Philmont Scout Ranch
More than 950,000 Scouts, Venturers, and leaders have experienced the adventure of the Philmont Scout Ranch since 1939. It is the Boy Scouts of America’s largest, national High Adventure Base with 34 staffed camps and 55 trail camps that provide an unforgettable adventure in the high country along hundreds of miles of rugged, rocky trail. The Ranch is certified to the SFI 2010-2014 Standard.

ROANOKE CENTER

Collaborating with African American Forest Landowners to Maintain Working Forests

Sustainable Forestry and African American Land Retention Program
Why this project matters
Although African Americans had amassed 15 million acres/6 million hectares of land in the U.S. South between 1865 and 1919, today 97% of those lands have been lost, according to the Land Trust Alliance. Forestry offers many older farmers, landowners not living on their land, and multiple generations of heirs who want to keep their land together, an opportunity to keep their land in the family while generating income from it. Managed forestry can help landowners prosper in retirement and through multiple generations. It can also be a powerful tool to help resolve heirs’ property issues and ownership questions and it offers a means to help preserve the important social and cultural heritage of African American land ownership.
Why is SFI involved?
SFI is committed to identifying ways to support engaging African American forest owners in the U.S. South, including land retention. SFI, as an organization that stands for future forests, believes we can collaborate to help keep forests as forests and ensure that they are responsibly managed to provide conservation values as well as financial benefits to the African Americans who own these forestlands.
This is a collaborative community-based project aligns with two SFI focal areas. It leverages the engagement of Sustainable Forestry Initiative Implementation Committees (SICs) to enrich the link between people and forests; and it supports underserved communities through forestry, with a focus on rural communities and minority landowners.
How the project builds SFI community engagement
SFI has a stewardship responsibility to help maintain the heritage of African American connections to the land in the U.S. South. SFI is also committed to helping to elevate the management quality and asset value of African American forestland to the level that is enjoyed by many other southern landowners. Through partnership and support of others operating effectively on these issues, and by using the natural strength of SFI Implementation Committees and our network of Program Participants, SFI can become a vital piece of the solution to this important challenge.
The project involves a variety of activities through collaboration of non-profits, educational institutions, forestry agencies and the legal profession. Expected results will include African American forestland owners improving management of family forestlands and connecting families to forests across multiple generations. The project will also enrich understanding of the link between well-managed forests and conservation-related outcomes. And it will promote the use of forest products carrying the SFI label, which illustrates the values of well‑managed forests and their impact on our daily lives.
Partners
This partnership includes local business development volunteers, legal experts, government officials, SFI Program Participants and academics.
  • Project lead: The Roanoke Center
  • Sustainable Forestry Initiative
  • North Carolina SFI Implementation Committee
  • Enviva Biomass (SFI Program Participant)
  • US Endowment for Forestry and Communities
  • Natural Resources Conservation Service
  • North Carolina Forest Service — Stewardship Program
  • North Carolina Extension Forestry Program
  • Gragg Law Firm
  • Roanoke Electric Cooperative
  • North Carolina Tree Farm Program
  • North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services
  • University of Mount Olive
Related information
About the Roanoke Center
The Roanoke Center is part of Roanoke Economic Development, Inc. The center provides services to individuals and small businesses to the improve quality of life in in Virginia. The Roanoke Center strives to maximize the benefits of projects and activities that make the region a better place to live and work. It uses sustainable forestry initiatives to restore and conserve threatened African American forestland by increasing forest-owner income and land asset values. Landowners have access to many services, including outreach and education, technical and legal assistance, mapping, forest management planning and implementation, conservation and restoration, and access to new forestry technologies and emerging markets. The center also engages youth and young adults in learning what they need to know to advance sustainable forestry on their family lands and it provides role models, mentoring and internship opportunities to begin cultivating future natural resource professionals.

SAN CARLOS APACHE FOREST RESOURCES PROGRAM

Nowhi ni’ nlt’eego anlish (Take Care of Our Land) San Carlos Natural Resource Youth Practicum (NRYP)

Project Overview
Nowhi ni’ nlt’eego anlish San Carlos Natural Resource Youth Practicum will be in its ninth year of hosting tribal students so they can learn about natural resources and Apache culture. The NYRP takes place 50 miles north of the community in wellness facility cabins in forested country.
During this practicum, which will receive $10,000 in grant funding from SFI Inc. in 2016 and 2017, Tribal elders will share traditional knowledge and history. Topics of study and hands-on activities will cover many disciplines such as wildlife, forestry, soils conservation, hydrology, climate, geographic information systems, watersheds, wetlands, archaeology and other environmental disciplines.
Project Partners
In addition to the San Carlos Apache Forest Resources Program, partners include the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service and San Carlos High School.
About San Carlos Apache Forest Resources Program
The San Carlos Apache Tribe’s respect for the natural world is rooted in a tradition of environmental stewardship. Today, the Forest Resources Program of the San Carlos Apache Tribe continues this deep-rooted tribal practice by planning and implementing natural resource management plans that work toward the healthy landscape conditions of pre-reservation times. Additionally, the Forest Resources Program also provides natural resource education and outreach as well as assistance for college.

SCOUTS CANADA

SFI Is Helping Scouts Canada Support Future Forest Leaders

The EnviroMentality Initiative
Why this project matters
Today’s youth face barriers to experiencing the natural world around them and will face complex environmental challenges in the future­. Since 2007, Scouts Canada and Sears Canada have joined forces to promote Scouts Canada’s youth environmental programming through in-store fundraising events. This fundraising supports Scouts Canada’s EnvironMentality funding initiative.
EnvironMentality will support 20 environmental stewardship projects through an open call for proposals among the Scouting community. These initiatives could include learning about environmental and conservation issues, working on strategies for remediation and maintaining healthy ecosystems, and sharing best practices within communities to build momentum for other environmental stewardship projects.
A wide range of projects benefit from EnviroMentality funding including adopting and caring for community green spaces. Scoutrees is another signature project. Each spring, thousands of Scouts plant trees in every province, and in doing so they learn about the important role trees have in our lives, the critical need for conservation, and how we can do our part to create a better world.
Why is SFI involved?
SFI values this project because it will educate youth about the importance of environmental stewardship as an effective way to ensure the sustainability of the environment in the future. The hands‑on focus of the EnvironMentality projects also promises to engage youth in a fun and lasting way.
One of SFI’s priorities is to connect youth to forests through education. We look for ways to instill a lifelong appreciation for the value forests represent for biodiversity, the wider environment, sustainable communities, responsibly sourced forest products and for our shared quality of life. The educational focus of this project also supports SFI’s focus on encouraging the next generation of future forest leaders.
Our work with Scouts Canada, Girl Guides of Canada, Boy Scouts of America, and other youth organizations and school programs like Earth Rangers and Project Learning Tree helps build healthy kids. It also engages youth in conservation activities and outdoor education.
Our kids’ contact with nature keeps shrinking. Today’s emphasis on screen time and indoor play is also linked to psychological and physical effects like obesity, loneliness, depression and attention problems. Getting kids into forests and helping them learn about sustainability is good for forests and good for kids.
How the project builds SFI community engagement
Through the EnvironMentality project, Scouts Canada will have an opportunity to collaborate with SFI Inc. to launch community-based green initiatives. This will foster community engagement among SFI Program Participants, SFI Implementation Committees and other SFI partners.
SFI’s community engagement efforts include the work of SFI Implementation Committees, SFI Community Grants Partners and SFI Inc. initiatives. These efforts have helped elevate and enrich the connections between people and forests. Our community programs enhance the vital link that exists between healthy forests, responsible purchasing and sustainable communities.
Partners
This partnership includes community leaders, government and the not-for-profit sector.
  • Project lead: Scouts Canada
  • Sustainable Forestry Initiative
  • Sears Canada
Related Information
About Scouts Canada
Scouts Canada is the country’s leading youth organization. For more than 100 years, we have brought a world of adventure, outdoor experience and friendship to 17 million Canadian youth.
Scouts have a lot of fun discovering new things and experiences they wouldn’t have elsewhere. Along the way they develop into capable, confident and well-rounded individuals, better prepared for success in the world.
Scouting offers a world where you can discover the best in yourself and the best in others.

SIERRA NEVADA JOURNEYS

Nevada Teachers Participate in Project Learning Tree Boot Camp

Forestry Education Initiative
Why this project matters
Getting kids into the outdoors and teaching them hands-on science so they can think critically and solve problems collaboratively is one of the most important things we can do for today’s youth. This project involves two interrelated and complementary forestry education programs: Classrooms Unleashed and Next Generation Science Standards/Project Learning Tree Boot Camp. These programs focus on improving access to high quality science education and fostering natural resource stewardship. Project Learning Tree, an SFI program, is an award-winning environmental education program designed for teachers and other educators, parents, and community leaders working with youth from preschool through grade 12.
Classrooms Unleashed employs classroom and outdoor exploration of natural systems as a framework for critical thinking and problem solving. The program applies concepts from the formal classroom environment, directly engaging and educating youth, and the informal, outdoor classroom through a hands-on, experiential model to interact with the natural world.
The Next Generation Science Standards/Project Learning Tree Boot Camp will directly expand audiences for Project Learning Tree (PLT), which will effectively reach more students in environmental, science education. In addition, the boot camp increases the effectiveness of the PLT program because teachers are immersed in learning for the weekend.
Why is SFI involved?
One of SFI’s priorities is to connect youth to forests through education. We look for ways to instill a lifelong appreciation for the value forests represent for biodiversity, the wider environment, sustainable communities, responsibly sourced forest products and for our shared quality of life. The educational focus of this project also supports SFI’s focus on encouraging the next generation of future forest leaders.
SFI is also committed to engaging with and supporting underserved communities through educational initiatives. This commitment is shared by the project lead Sierra Nevada Journeys. As its programs continue to grow, they are committed to increasing community-wide accessibility. Fueled by the generous support of its donors, more than 55% of the children Sierra Nevada Journeys served in 2016 came from low-income households.
How the project builds SFI community engagement
At SFI, we are also keen to collaborate further with Sierra Nevada Journeys to develop program models and share them with the full PLT network in innovative ways to grow the capacity of our network. To broaden its impact, Sierra Nevada Journeys has expanded program offerings across grades 1-6 and expanded its programs to serve the demand from a range of communities. They are now serving more than 20,000 students annually. Its programs also engage families to reinforce classroom concepts through Family Science/STEM Nights.
The program also features cooperation with the Northwest Regional Professional Development Program and the Desert Research Institute. The Northwest Regional Professional Development is committed to elevating student performance by providing sustained professional learning and building regional partnerships. The Desert Research Institute is a recognized world leader in investigating the effects of natural and human-induced environmental change and advancing technologies aimed at assessing a changing planet.
Partners
This partnership includes educators and researchers.
  • Project lead: Sierra Nevada Journeys
  • Sustainable Forestry Initiative
  • Project Learning Tree
  • Northwest Regional Professional Development Program
  • Desert Research Institute
Related information
  • SFI connects youth to forests through education (project highlights).
  • Project Learning Tree, an SFI program, is an award-winning environmental education program designed for teachers and other educators, parents, and community leaders working with youth from preschool through grade 12.
About Sierra Nevada Journeys
Sierra Nevada Journeys is a nonprofit that delivers innovative outdoor, science-based education programs for youth to develop critical thinking skills and to inspire natural resource stewardship. Through multiple points of contact, our classroom-based programs, overnight science camps, professional development for teachers, and parent engagement opportunities surround students with resources they need to succeed. All programs are designed to foster higher cognition and build long-term student achievement.

SOUTH CAROLINA FORESTRY FOUNDATION

Teaching Sustainable Forestry Through Environmental Education

Project Overview
The South Carolina Forestry Foundation will receive a total of $10,000 for two seven-day graduate-level teachers’ tours in 2012 and 2013 showing how working forests support South Carolina’s environment, economy and quality of life, and using SFI water resources requirements as a model for responsible forestry.
Supporting the SFI Standard
The project will support requirements in the SFI 2010-2014 Standard related to protection of water resources and community involvement, including Objective 3: Protection and Maintenance of Water Resources; Objective 10: Adherence to Best Management Practices; and Objective 17: Community Involvement in the Practice of Sustainable Forestry. It will also support Objective 9: Use of Qualified Resource and Qualified Logging Professionals.
Project Partners
In addition to the South Carolina Forestry Foundation, partners include the South Carolina SFI Implementation Committee, South Carolina Forestry Commission, South Carolina Timber Producers Association and South Carolina Tree Farm Committee.
Project Details
The teachers’ tours are designed to provide an unbiased look into the impact forests have on South Carolina’s environment, economy and quality of life, and to show how SFI 2010-2014 Standard requirements support sustainable forestry, with emphasis on protection of water resources. It will look at ways to encourage youth to become involved in forestry, natural resources activities and careers.
The graduate level conservation courses include three days of advanced environmental education training at the South Carolina Forestry Commission’s Harbison State Forest Environmental Education Center in Columbia, SC, followed by a four-day field workshop/tour. Guest speakers include educators, foresters, researchers, wildlife biologists, and professionals within the industries toured and state and federal government agency professionals. Participants will be able to use the educational materials supporting the training in their classroom curriculum.
News
SFI Conservation Grants to Focus on Protecting Water Resources
News Release – May 30, 2012
Project Resources
Project Overview PDF
About the South Carolina Forestry Foundation
The private, non-profit South Carolina Forestry Foundation is a partnership of individuals and companies, including landowners, loggers, foresters, educators, researchers, conservationists, and sportsmen, dedicated to forest conservation and the sustainable use of natural resources.

SOUTH CAROLINA FORESTRY FOUNDATION

SFI Is Helping Inspire Future Forest Leaders in South Carolina

Wood Magic Forest Fair
Why this project matters
The Wood Magic Forest Fair is a free, fun, forestry-fact-filled field trip and festival for fourth-graders in South Carolina. Through SFI grant funding, the South Carolina Forestry Foundation will be able to revise its fourth-grade curriculum and program for fifth-graders to better align with the new South Carolina Department of Education Science Standards.
A series of four-hour programs at three locations around the state will offer forestry-related educational experiences and demonstrations. The fair combines hands-on activities with visually engaging presentations to teach children about the importance of forest lands to wildlife, the economy and our daily quality of life. The fair has a successful track record of engaging kids and helping them learn about the many environmental, social, and economic benefits provided by South Carolina’s forests.
Every year teachers administer a pre-fair test and a post-fair test. Highlights include:
  • Before the program, only 45% of the students understood that the U.S. has more forests today than it did 100 years ago, 75% knew this to be the case afterward.
  • After the fair, 95% of the students recognized that trees are a renewable natural resource.
  • Beforehand, only 31% of the students thought that using trees for the products we need is an environmentally friendly thing to do. After the fair, 77% recognized the environmental benefits of well-managed forests.
Why is SFI involved?
SFI values this project because it makes the link between forestry and South Carolina Department of Education Science Standards. It also increases their appreciation of South Carolina’s forests.
One of SFI’s priorities is to connect youth to forests through education. We look for ways to instill a lifelong appreciation for the value forests represent for biodiversity, the wider environment, sustainable communities, responsibly sourced forest products and for our shared quality of life. The educational focus of this project also supports SFI’s focus on encouraging the next generation of future forest leaders.
Our work with Boy Scouts of America, Girl Guides of Canada, Scouts Canada, and other youth organizations and school programs like Project Learning Tree and Earth Rangers, helps build healthy kids. It also engages youth in conservation activities and outdoor education.
Our kids’ contact with nature keeps shrinking. Today’s emphasis on screen time and indoor play is also linked to psychological and physical effects like obesity, loneliness, depression and attention problems. Getting kids into forests and helping them learn about sustainability is good for forests and good for kids.
How the project builds SFI community engagement
The Wood Magic Forest Fair brings together a diverse group of 58 organizations including SFI Program Participants, the South Carolina SFI Implementation Committee, conservationists, academics, community leaders, and state and federal government representatives.
Approximately 90 individual volunteers from the forestry community and other organizations came together in 2016 to make this forestry education program successful. Most importantly, the Wood Magic Fair has touched the lives of more than 31,500 fourth graders since its inception in 1999. Engaging kids is a proven strategy to change how families and the communities they live in perceive sustainability issues.
Partners
This partnership includes representatives from non-profit groups and SFI Program Participants. These partners include:
  • Project lead: South Carolina Forestry Foundation
  • Sustainable Forestry Initiative
  • South Carolina SFI Implementation Committee (consists of SFI Program Participants)
  • South Carolina Forestry Commission
Related information
About South Carolina Forestry Foundation
The private, non-profit South Carolina Forestry Foundation is a partnership of individuals and companies, including landowners, loggers, foresters, educators, researchers, conservationists, and sportsmen, dedicated to forest conservation and the sustainable use of natural resources.

SOUTH CAROLINA FORESTRY FOUNDATION

Teaching Sustainable Forestry Through Environmental Education

Project Overview
The South Carolina Forestry Foundation will receive a total of $10,000 for two seven-day graduate-level teachers’ tours in 2012 and 2013 showing how working forests support South Carolina’s environment, economy and quality of life, and using SFI water resources requirements as a model for responsible forestry.
Supporting the SFI Standard
The project will support requirements in the SFI 2010-2014 Standard related to protection of water resources and community involvement, including Objective 3: Protection and Maintenance of Water Resources; Objective 10: Adherence to Best Management Practices; and Objective 17: Community Involvement in the Practice of Sustainable Forestry. It will also support Objective 9: Use of Qualified Resource and Qualified Logging Professionals.
Project Partners
In addition to the South Carolina Forestry Foundation, partners include the South Carolina SFI Implementation Committee, South Carolina Forestry Commission, South Carolina Timber Producers Association and South Carolina Tree Farm Committee.
Project Details
The teachers’ tours are designed to provide an unbiased look into the impact forests have on South Carolina’s environment, economy and quality of life, and to show how SFI 2010-2014 Standard requirements support sustainable forestry, with emphasis on protection of water resources. It will look at ways to encourage youth to become involved in forestry, natural resources activities and careers.
The graduate level conservation courses include three days of advanced environmental education training at the South Carolina Forestry Commission’s Harbison State Forest Environmental Education Center in Columbia, SC, followed by a four-day field workshop/tour. Guest speakers include educators, foresters, researchers, wildlife biologists, and professionals within the industries toured and state and federal government agency professionals. Participants will be able to use the educational materials supporting the training in their classroom curriculum.
News
SFI Conservation Grants to Focus on Protecting Water Resources
News Release – May 30, 2012
Project Resources
Project Overview PDF
About the South Carolina Forestry Foundation
The private, non-profit South Carolina Forestry Foundation is a partnership of individuals and companies, including landowners, loggers, foresters, educators, researchers, conservationists, and sportsmen, dedicated to forest conservation and the sustainable use of natural resources.